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Old 09-01-2012, 03:46 PM   #11
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My concern with going straight to the chest freezer was that I don't think it is good for it to run for so long. I am worried about it overheating.


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Old 09-03-2012, 04:31 PM   #12
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"My concern with going straight to the chest freezer was that I don't think it is good for it to run for so long. I am worried about it overheating."

The condensor is sized to reject the heat removed from the space when it is loaded with a certain weight of product. Product respiration and enthalpy are part of it. However, running a chest freezer at 50 or 60 deg. F. is harder on the compressor than running at 0 deg F.. NOOBs that toss in an electronic operator, set with a one or two degree dead band beat the compressor up pretty good. It's stop and go that rips up a compressor. The compressors are suction gas cooled and when the compressor doesn't run long enough, the suction superheat never gets to the point where the compressor motor is adequately cooled....I would worry more about the time it takes for the wort to hit pitching temps and using plastic buckets, than the freezer. Never believe that a 90 minute boil ends DMS and it won't come back. Chilling the wort isn't a waste of time. A waste of time, is waiting for the wort to cool. Chill the wort to pitching temps within 20 minutes and you'll make a much finer beer. Wort needs a quick cold break. Otherwise, oddball flavors come out and the "Ugly Baby Syndrome" that someone mentioned, comes into play.


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Old 09-03-2012, 04:55 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VladOfTrub
Chill the wort to pitching temps within 20 minutes and you'll make a much finer beer. Wort needs a quick cold break. Otherwise, oddball flavors come out and the "Ugly Baby Syndrome" that someone mentioned, comes into play.
I have seen no hard evidence of this. Do you have a study that backs up this claim?
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Old 09-03-2012, 05:28 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingfish
I have seen no hard evidence of this. Do you have a study that backs up this claim?
+1, I have no-chilled 6 batches so far. They have all been very good beers with no off flavors.
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Old 09-04-2012, 11:16 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VladOfTrub
I would worry more about the time it takes for the wort to hit pitching temps and using plastic buckets, than the freezer.
Worry about using plastic buckets? Do tell.
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Old 09-10-2012, 03:32 PM   #16
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Brewed a brown ale Sunday evening. Everything went very well. I turned off the flame and poured the wort into a freshly sanitized bucket and popped on the stoppered lid. I did have to vent it a couple times right after dumping into the bucket as the steam threatened to blow the lid off. I actually did not have a stopper and forgot to pick on up so I used a wire nut. It fit in the hole just fine and sealed up around the grommet in the bucket. I put it in my spare fridge where it sat until it got down to about 140 and put it in the chest freezer set to 64 (had been pre-chilled to 40). I did vent the lid a couple times after it started to cool. Not sure if I had to but did not want to deform the bucket.

Sunday morning the temp reading was 64. The lid was sucked in but had not too bad. I aerated with a wire whisk on a cordless drill. I pitched a very large quantity of my commercially harvested Wyeast 1968 yeast. Had bubbling in the blowoff jug after about 6 hours.

I had planned to pour the wort into another fermentor to leave behind the trub but just plain forgot about it.
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Old 09-10-2012, 03:38 PM   #17
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+1, I have no-chilled 6 batches so far. They have all been very good beers with no off flavors.
+2 (over 100 gallons no-chilled). I wish folks would try things for themselves instead of parroting advice or quoting "studies".


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