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Old 08-30-2012, 11:50 AM   #1
twofieros
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Made a corona clone recipe from AHS. It had 6lbs base malt and 6lbs of flaked maze. I used the liquid yeast with a 1L starter. Fermented in my kegerator at 60 for a week then moved it to secondary and placed at 70 for two weeks. I then bottled and tried it last night. It wasn't terrible but not corona. I noticed a oily mouthfeel and a taste of butter. I thought that meant I didn't let the yeast clean up the beer. Diacytles or something.

What can I do now, if anything, to rescue my beer? Thanks for the input.

Tim

 
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Old 08-30-2012, 12:05 PM   #2
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Sounds exactly like diacetyl... Nothing to be done for it. I have had some issues with my pale lagers and diacetyl in the past. In the future, ferment at a lower temp (~50F) and raise it up to 65F or so about 2/3 of the way through fermentation.
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Old 08-30-2012, 12:16 PM   #3
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It is Diacetyl. You will want to employ a diacetyl rest in your lagering routine. Especially when using that much adjunct.

 
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Old 08-30-2012, 12:28 PM   #4
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Sounds just like corona to me, that is all that I can taste in corona is a crisco oil type of taste.

 
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Old 08-30-2012, 12:40 PM   #5
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I didn't know that the corn would possibly increase diacetyl. So, if I try this again I should do the rest when the yeast are starting to calm down but still active and I should ferment colder? I'd like to master this. It was my first recipe to use maze and my second lager/pilsner. Thanks for the input.

 
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Old 08-30-2012, 12:47 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twofieros View Post
I didn't know that the corn would possibly increase diacetyl. So, if I try this again I should do the rest when the yeast are starting to calm down but still active and I should ferment colder? I'd like to master this. It was my first recipe to use maze and my second lager/pilsner. Thanks for the input.
It really depends on the yeast strain you used- most lager strains need to be fermented at about 50 degrees while most ale strains are fermented in the mid 60s. If you used a lager strain, a 1 liter starter wasn't a big enough starter and 60 degrees for fermentation temperature is far too warm.

Diacetyl doesn't come from the flaked maize, it is a byproduct of the yeast. Stressed yeast will create more diacteyl, and some yeast strains produce more diacetyl than others naturally.
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Old 08-30-2012, 01:27 PM   #7
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Maybe too much flaked corn? I thought flaked anything can add oil like flavors and appearances at over 8% if the grist.

 
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Old 08-30-2012, 03:33 PM   #8
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For a nice crisp lager, you are going to want to take the advice of Yooper seriously. BIG starter (most of my lagers get 1 gallon, big lagers over 1.060 get 1.5-2gallon starters) Ferment cold 50-54 is the range you are looking for, then warm up to 65-70 for a day and then lager. It is a "lager" after all. Drop that temp down to 34 for a month and you should be good, but taste some samples the whole way through to get an idea how the flavor is changing. Even though many on these boards disparage light lager, it is a very difficult style to brew if you are new to lagers.

 
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Old 08-31-2012, 02:04 AM   #9
twofieros
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I would like to brew light beers. I will try this one again with a bigger starter and colder temps. The weird thing was that I tried this beer through each transfer and never got the off flavors I have now. Is there anyway it could have been caused by the priming sugar? Maybe the pressure got too high killing the yeast before they could clean it up? I can't bring myself to dump beer but these will be set aside to age and maybe improve? If not I'll run it through a still and make fuel.

Thanks for the input!

 
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Old 09-06-2012, 11:51 AM   #10
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I wanted to update this thread. I let this beer sit another week and tried it last night. The diacetyl taste is gone. This beer is really clean and crisp now! It must have been that the bottle conditioning wasn't done yet. I'm glad. I didn't want another bad batch.

 
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