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Old 09-12-2013, 06:25 PM   #41
Jipper
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Could always measure out a very small amount of lactic acid and beer, see if you like the effect, and then scale up if you do? Might be a better route than just adding acid to the keg and potentially adding too much - just a thought! Either way let us know how it goes.

Cheers!


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Old 09-12-2013, 06:40 PM   #42
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I tried adding lactic acid to a tart fruit beer once. I added 15ml to six gallons of beer. Yes, it added some noticeable sourness and acidity, but I can't say it makes a good substitute for lactic acid fermentation with respect to flavor. I don't think I'll ever try that again.


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Old 09-12-2013, 06:48 PM   #43
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I think I'm going to try what Matt suggested. Might pull out three pints and add different amounts of lactic acid to each one, have a couple friends over that know sours to help try and determine the amount that tastes best to all of us.
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Old 09-12-2013, 07:17 PM   #44
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I added the lactic acid in 5ml increments to the entire batch and sampled it each time. I had the right amount, but didn't like what it did to the flavor of the beer.

Vinny C doesn't recommend adding lactic acid to a sour beer that isn't sour enough. This is something I learned after I tried it. In his words, it makes it taste medicinal. If I knew this, I probably would have tried it anyway.
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:38 PM   #45
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I brewed this last Dec and finally got around to sampling it. It tastes great! Still on the fence about adding the oak or not (leaning to not). Also, I want to bottle this but not sure if the yeast is still viable (been nearly 10 months) enough or will I have to add new yeast for the priming sugar. Anyone have any thoughts on adding new yeast?
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:43 PM   #46
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I was also on the fence about adding the oak, glad I did, it doesn't over power the flavor at all, it really compliments it. I was actually only intending on leaving the oak in for a few weeks but work got busy and I left it for over four and it was still fine.
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:51 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by javaguru View Post
I brewed this last Dec and finally got around to sampling it. It tastes great! Still on the fence about adding the oak or not (leaning to not). Also, I want to bottle this but not sure if the yeast is still viable (been nearly 10 months) enough or will I have to add new yeast for the priming sugar. Anyone have any thoughts on adding new yeast?
I might try adding new yeast personally. Might try using a wine yeast, as the pH might be pretty low, making it tough for a lot of beer yeast strains to survive / do their job. Good luck, and glad it's tasting great so far!
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:51 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fxdude View Post
I was also on the fence about adding the oak, glad I did, it doesn't over power the flavor at all, it really compliments it. I was actually only intending on leaving the oak in for a few weeks but work got busy and I left it for over four and it was still fine.
Thanks, that's good to know. Maybe I chance it. I was just afraid of mucking up something that has taken this long. Ha, probably a common fear for first time sour brewers like myself.
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:54 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jipper View Post
I might try adding new yeast personally. Might try using a wine yeast, as the pH might be pretty low, making it tough for a lot of beer yeast strains to survive / do their job. Good luck, and glad it's tasting great so far!
Thanks! Yeah, saw on older post about using Rockpile...will give it a shot!
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Old 09-13-2013, 01:00 PM   #50
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Vinnie uses Rockpile, so that would be a fine choice. I like to use Champagne yeast (EC-1118/Premier Cuvée) because of its tolerance to alcohol, pH, temp, etc. Very robust and readily available. Rockpile I've had to order, and found no difference in the end product.


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