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Old 08-29-2012, 12:32 PM   #1
scorpien222
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Ok so I get the impression that there is not a product on the market that just completely stops fermentation campden and I thing potassium sorbate if I have that right inhibit reproduction but also effect taste ? I am open to corrections on any of this so far but my question is after primary fermentation and you have racked a wine off a few times to get rid of the nasty stuff at the bottom how long to the yeast live if all of the consumable sugars have gone ? I am assuming that back sweetening it just a case of adding some more sugar to the wine just before bottling ? But how do you know all the little yeasties have gone ?

 
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Old 08-29-2012, 12:45 PM   #2
Arpolis
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I don't know for sure but I had a wine on leese for 10 weeks and used that to start another wine and it worked. So it is more than 10 weeks.
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Old 08-29-2012, 12:53 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arpolis
I don't know for sure but I had a wine on leese for 10 weeks and used that to start another wine and it worked. So it is more than 10 weeks.
Thanks for the response and I suppose that's a start :-) over 10 weeks and does it also depend on the strain can some survive longer than others.

 
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Old 08-29-2012, 04:19 PM   #4
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I would assume that a well cultivated/breed yest from Lalvin would last longer than say a bread yeast. But again, you know what happens when you assume.
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Old 08-29-2012, 09:27 PM   #5
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Here's a thought, and it was something I read, when I was researching recipes for making mead. One of the recipes called for 3 TBS of 100 proof grain alcohol, per gallon to stop the fermentation. But, this recipe ALSO said that you should drink mead after one month, as it doesn't age well. After reading posts in the mead forum, and asking questions, I now know that isn't true, so you may or may not want to take this with a grain of 100 proof alcohol!

 
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Old 08-29-2012, 09:53 PM   #6
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If you don't exceed the alcohol tolerance of the yeast (having them die of alcohol poisoning, so to speak), the yeast will be alive and well although dormant.

In order to sweeten a wine, you'd rack as needed and wait to the wine is completely clear and no longer dropping any lees at all. Then you would rack the wine onto a solution of campden and sorbate (1 crushed campden tablet per gallon and 1/2 teaspoon of sorbate per gallon). Neither kill wine yeast, but sorbate inhibits yeast reproduction. It works better in the presence of campden, so that is why the campden is added. Since there are still yeast even in the clearest wine, adding the sorbate means it can't reproduce and probably won't be able to restart fermentation. It's not a guarantee, but it works pretty well in a clear wine that has been at FG for a long period of time.

Otherwise, pasteurizing the wine is the only real way to kill the yeast still in solution. That's usually not practical.

Some people will feed the wine more honey or sugar, so that the yeast will start to do of alcohol toxicity. But that is sort of a crapshoot, since wine yeast strains can easily push 18% or more in a happy environment. Which means you'd have sweet hot rocket fuel before the yeast would finally die off.

Cold stabilization also helps. What I mean is if you have a wine that is finished, but still dropping lees, you can put it someplace cold (in the low 40s) and that will encourage more yeast to fall out. Once it's completely clear, it can be racked off the lees and then stabilized with sorbate and campden. That usually works pretty well.
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Old 08-30-2012, 06:54 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper
If you don't exceed the alcohol tolerance of the yeast (having them die of alcohol poisoning, so to speak), the yeast will be alive and well although dormant.

In order to sweeten a wine, you'd rack as needed and wait to the wine is completely clear and no longer dropping any lees at all. Then you would rack the wine onto a solution of campden and sorbate (1 crushed campden tablet per gallon and 1/2 teaspoon of sorbate per gallon). Neither kill wine yeast, but sorbate inhibits yeast reproduction. It works better in the presence of campden, so that is why the campden is added. Since there are still yeast even in the clearest wine, adding the sorbate means it can't reproduce and probably won't be able to restart fermentation. It's not a guarantee, but it works pretty well in a clear wine that has been at FG for a long period of time.

Otherwise, pasteurizing the wine is the only real way to kill the yeast still in solution. That's usually not practical.

Some people will feed the wine more honey or sugar, so that the yeast will start to do of alcohol toxicity. But that is sort of a crapshoot, since wine yeast strains can easily push 18% or more in a happy environment. Which means you'd have sweet hot rocket fuel before the yeast would finally die off.

Cold stabilization also helps. What I mean is if you have a wine that is finished, but still dropping lees, you can put it someplace cold (in the low 40s) and that will encourage more yeast to fall out. Once it's completely clear, it can be racked off the lees and then stabilized with sorbate and campden. That usually works pretty well.
So basically if you are wanting a sweet wine the process is greatly increased while you rack off and cold stabilize the wine the other issue I had is I bought a pack of campden tablets and on the back of the ones I have it said to completely stabilize the wine add two tablets which I did to my first one gallon of rhubarb wine which I have posted the recipe for an it is delicious :-) but when I added the campden tablets my wine ha lost its color if was a beautiful rose and it's now a white the recipe dust ask for them I decided to try and stabilize the wine a little early does this color loss always happen when these are used ??

 
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Old 08-30-2012, 01:17 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scorpien222 View Post
So basically if you are wanting a sweet wine the process is greatly increased while you rack off and cold stabilize the wine the other issue I had is I bought a pack of campden tablets and on the back of the ones I have it said to completely stabilize the wine add two tablets which I did to my first one gallon of rhubarb wine which I have posted the recipe for an it is delicious :-) but when I added the campden tablets my wine ha lost its color if was a beautiful rose and it's now a white the recipe dust ask for them I decided to try and stabilize the wine a little early does this color loss always happen when these are used ??
The color loss could be due to several things- the natural color sometimes does change with the wine clears (even my tomato wine is golden when it's done!), or from sunlight/light, or maybe from the campden. Keep your wine in a cool dark place out of the light, and don't over sulfite anymore.
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:11 PM   #9
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The rhubarb wine I made was delicious even with the color loss from the campden tablets it didn't last very long though :-s my first gallon has gone lucky I have another have going I might actually get to age some of that batch :-)

 
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:15 PM   #10
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Where should yeast be stored?

 
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