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Old 08-29-2012, 12:10 PM   #11
Jbird
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You all true. Bring the water to a boil then turn it off and wait 5min. you then add the grains and steep for 30min with the lid on. The temp will drop on its own and you will be fine.



 
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Old 08-29-2012, 07:31 PM   #12
Johnnyhitch1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jbird View Post
You all true. Bring the water to a boil then turn it off and wait 5min. you then add the grains and steep for 30min with the lid on. The temp will drop on its own and you will be fine.
water boils at 212*F after 5 min i would expect it do be no less than 190-200 which is still very high for steeping...grab a cheap thermometor and be precise!

12 bucks for a thermo and probe

10 bucks for Gram scale in .01 increments


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Old 08-29-2012, 09:43 PM   #13
PhillyMike
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Boiling grains (actually anything over 170 or so) will release tannins (poly phenols) which add off flavors and unwanted bitterness.

 
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Old 08-29-2012, 09:55 PM   #14
Dan
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I've read two versions on steeping grains and as far as I can determine they are the only two correct procedures.

1. Add the grain bag to cool water. Bring the temp to 155F, kill the flame and steep 30 minutes.

2. Bring water up to 150 add the grain bag and maintain 150 for 30 minutes.

I've done both and they seem to work equally well.

I think the first is easier and waste less energy.

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Old 08-30-2012, 02:41 PM   #15
Chipster27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattHollingsworth
With steeping grains, you're not getting conversion. I'm not talking about any kind of mini mash or anything, just steeping.

Thanks guys.
Well then I'm lost. The whole purpose of soaking/steeping/mashing the grains at ~150 is for the enzyme conversion. Everyone that has responded has said e same thing. ~150 degrees for 30 minutes raise temp to 170, remove. How is that different than mashing? Only difference is that you're not doing the whole grain bill in a mash tun.

 
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Old 08-30-2012, 02:53 PM   #16
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I have read that some grains will contribute more sugars to the wort than others so some are just for flavor and others are more for the sugars.

I used to add the grains when the water was getting hot and then leave the heat on. I was aiming for 20 minutes and no more than 170. I usually had the two come together withing a few minutes.

This saved the time of getting the water to steeping temperature first and then the trouble of adjusting the temperature.

The beers turned out great.

 
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Old 08-30-2012, 04:06 PM   #17
amandabab
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipster27 View Post
Well then I'm lost. The whole purpose of soaking/steeping/mashing the grains at ~150 is for the enzyme conversion. Everyone that has responded has said e same thing. ~150 degrees for 30 minutes raise temp to 170, remove. How is that different than mashing? Only difference is that you're not doing the whole grain bill in a mash tun.
most steeping grains don't have enough, or any enzymes to convert themselves.
steeping is for flavor and to extract non-fermentable sugars that were converted in the malting.

There is a large difference in steeping and mashing.

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Old 08-30-2012, 04:18 PM   #18
Chipster27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amandabab View Post
most steeping grains don't have enough, or any enzymes to convert themselves.
steeping is for flavor and to extract non-fermentable sugars that were converted in the malting.

There is a large difference in steeping and mashing.
See.... I was lost

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Old 08-30-2012, 05:40 PM   #19
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This is good stuff: 150-170 (no higher!) for 30 minutes.

What about clearing/rinsing out the small stuff from the grains first like they show in the NB DVD video.

And does moving the pouch/bag up and down in the hot water help, hinder, good, bad or ugly?

Thanks!

 
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Old 08-30-2012, 07:28 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FTG-05 View Post
This is good stuff: 150-170 (no higher!) for 30 minutes.

What about clearing/rinsing out the small stuff from the grains first like they show in the NB DVD video.

And does moving the pouch/bag up and down in the hot water help, hinder, good, bad or ugly?

Thanks!
Tapping out the fine dust before hand probably doesn't do much of anything in the grand scheme of things. It's just a few grams of material that won't end up as trub.

As far as the dunk and swish, I think that's fine as long as you're not doing it for the full 30 mins, and you're not bouncing it so hard as to compact the grains which would extract more tannin flavor than you want.
I do a few dunks in the beginning, and a few in the end, and then I'm done with it. The key is to be gentle and don't squeeze.


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