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Old 09-13-2012, 02:47 PM   #11
kingwood-kid
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A lot of commercial beers are pasteurized before packaging, and get excellent sales and/or reviews. I've done almost exactly the same thing the OP did, and it worked great. It's quite possible that he didn't waste a whole hour of his time. If this didn't work, and the beer is awful, he's not contractually required to drink it; dumping it is still an option.
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Old 09-13-2012, 05:02 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingwood-kid View Post
A lot of commercial beers are pasteurized before packaging, and get excellent sales and/or reviews. I've done almost exactly the same thing the OP did, and it worked great. It's quite possible that he didn't waste a whole hour of his time. If this didn't work, and the beer is awful, he's not contractually required to drink it; dumping it is still an option.
I wasn't slamming his idea of pasteurization, I was commenting that he would be better served re-brewing instead of throwing good time/money after bad beer. If it is truly infected, pasteurization (or any other process) isn't going to get rid of all of the bad flavor/aroma compounds in the beer by the infection.

 
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Old 09-13-2012, 05:26 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by broadbill View Post
I wasn't slamming his idea of pasteurization, I was commenting that he would be better served re-brewing instead of throwing good time/money after bad beer. If it is truly infected, pasteurization (or any other process) isn't going to get rid of all of the bad flavor/aroma compounds in the beer by the infection.
I dump pretty quickly, so in prinicple I agree. But I'm interested in hearing the end of this story in a few weeks. And it's possible he had a brett infection that didn't have time to cause any/much flavor change.
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Old 09-13-2012, 07:29 PM   #14
kingwood-kid
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Heating the beer up to 190 could have boiled off some off-flavors, if they were there to begin with. I'm not really sure what the boiling points of various off-flavours are. If it ends up smelling a little funky, so do most dogs.

However, you probably lost a decent amount of your alcohol content by going over 173 degrees. I'd add enough vodka (or another spirit of your choice) to make up for about 50% of what you were supposed to have to begin with (I'm pulling the 50% part out of nowhere in particular). Good luck on your beer; it obviously means a lot to you.
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Old 09-14-2012, 11:37 AM   #15
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To be honest guys, the sentiment is more towards the beer, not the dog. Im not sure what I did wrong in the first place, so I can't really fix it next time ( no idea what step my sanitation fell through on).

I look at this batch as a 'well, I screwed the pooch (get it?) on that one, and it still came out good... So why not try something different?' but in the end, if it tastes like wet dog it will probably go the way of the dodo. BUT I tasted it while taking gravities, and it wasn't half bad.

We shall see.

 
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Old 09-16-2012, 03:29 PM   #16
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Same boat as OP...my ferm chamber started growing mold and a tiny bit got in two batches. I transfered and it looks fine (only two days ago though) but its my favorite recipe and I really want to see if I can save it. This is my first infection and if I have to dump it...I will with a heavy heart

 
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Old 09-16-2012, 11:13 PM   #17
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I think you call this "the Mario Illusion." Like the pint sized Italian character in Donkey Kong obsessed with saving a girl whom he can never really save, you want to save this beer.

My experience is that most saves don't work. I recently wasted a bunch of time, hops and yeast trying to save a batch that had a bit of scorching. I finally dumped it. My guess is this one's a goner.

In the future, once I get to the point of considering dumping I'm going to pull the plug. Seriously, how good can it turn out if you were deciding between the glass or the drain? Most people who say never to dump are interested in having a sour beer.
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Old 09-17-2012, 01:47 AM   #18
VladOfTrub
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"A lot of commercial beers are pasteurized before packaging, and get excellent sales and/or reviews. I've done almost exactly the same thing the OP did, and it worked great.."

The brewery pastuerize in the keg or bottle. They don't ferment it, dump it in a kettle to pastuerize because it went bad, add more fermentable stuff, and re-pitch yeast. Then, sell it. If it's bad beer, it is exactly that. No amount of aging cures bad beer. Unless the tastebuds are stunned.

 
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:39 PM   #19
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Gents,
I should be bottling this weekend, so I will give you a report on how horrible/wonderful this experiment turned out to be.

The way I look at it is if it works I have validated a path for other people who have similar issues, and if it fails, I only wasted a batch of beer I threw together at the last moment, a few cups of brown sugar and some bread yeast (don't judge me).

 
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Old 09-17-2012, 04:08 PM   #20
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His beer wasn't bad and neither was mine. They were just headed that way if we didn't intervene. Once your beer is scorched, it's scorched. A lot of misguided ingredients I've put in my beers couldn't be taken back out. But tiny amounts of some infecting organism that haven't ruined the beer yet can be fixed. The first signs of an infection don't necessarily mean the beer is irrevocably harmed, although that is a possibility. I drank one of my pasteurized stouts the other night, and it was fantastic in a completely non-barnyard, unsoured way. For the record, I never said anything about bread yeast or brown sugar, but that points to the fact that the OP spent about a dollar on new ingredients in an effort to save his batch. If it doesn't work, it's not like he's much worse off than he was before.
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