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Old 08-26-2012, 04:41 PM   #1
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Default cold crashing yeast starter VS NOT

Ive got a simple 1200ml yeast starter (1056) going on a stir plate. I placed it on the stir plate at 4 pm yesterday. (its been 20.5 hrs). i plan on brewing tomorrow I have a few questions concerning the process after i take it off the stir plate. First, is it better to let the yeast stay at fermentation temp for the duration of a total of 42 hours or is it best to cold crash after 24? The yeast on my stir plate is still cloudy. Also, what are the results of leaving the yeast on the stir plate for the duration? lastly should there be a "rest" (off the stir plate but before the frige) of the yeast before crashing? thanks for all responses. -cheers


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Old 08-26-2012, 10:47 PM   #2
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1) Depends on how much starter beer you're ok with going into your wort. It doesn't taste particularly good, so it can be a concern, but I am of the opinion that the size of a starter relative to the size of the batch makes negligible.

2) I brewed a beer on Friday that I had left the starter on the stir plate for ~54 hours before pitching right into the wort. I got an insanely active fermentation on the 1.070 wort which actually resulted in my first blow out since I started brewing. Shifted over to a blow off tube and all was well.

3) If you're going to crash, you don't need to wait. Just throw it in the fridge and pull it out when you start brewing. That way it will be up to pitching temp when you're ready.


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Old 08-27-2012, 04:35 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by nukebrewer View Post
1) Depends on how much starter beer you're ok with going into your wort. It doesn't taste particularly good, so it can be a concern, but I am of the opinion that the size of a starter relative to the size of the batch makes negligible.

2) I brewed a beer on Friday that I had left the starter on the stir plate for ~54 hours before pitching right into the wort. I got an insanely active fermentation on the 1.070 wort which actually resulted in my first blow out since I started brewing. Shifted over to a blow off tube and all was well.

3) If you're going to crash, you don't need to wait. Just throw it in the fridge and pull it out when you start brewing. That way it will be up to pitching temp when you're ready.
thanks for the reply. i unfortunately had to make the decision before i left to work this afternoon. results: i pulled the yeast off the stir plate after 21 hours. placed directly into the fridge and when i got home a few minutes ago i checked my yeast. what i found was a flask with almost a quarter inch of yeast and sediment on the bottom and a nicely flocculated beer on top. looks to be a nice product. i would still like to know everybody's view on this subject. i hear a lot of mixed reviews on the best way. i have tried several different ways but always end up with delicious and intoxicating beer. i just was wondering if there was a "right" way to do it. thanks again and cheers
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Old 08-27-2012, 01:13 PM   #4
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This is one of those areas of brewing where there's no right or wrong way. Many options:

1. Cold crash the yeast, pull from fridge and pitch just the yeast at 35-40F after pouring off the beer.
2. Cold crash the yeast, pull from fridge, let it warm to wort temp, then pitch after decanting.
3. Let the yeast settle at room temp, then pitch the entire starter.
4. Let the yeast settle at room temp, then pitch just the slurry.
5. Pitch entire starter directly from stir plate.

All of these work, and people practice every option. Generally, people will say that 3 is better than 4, but I'm not sure if anyone knows exactly what the difference is, in number of yeast cells.
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Old 08-27-2012, 01:30 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpeedYellow View Post
This is one of those areas of brewing where there's no right or wrong way. Many options:

1. Cold crash the yeast, pull from fridge and pitch just the yeast at 35-40F after pouring off the beer.
2. Cold crash the yeast, pull from fridge, let it warm to wort temp, then pitch after decanting.
3. Let the yeast settle at room temp, then pitch the entire starter.
4. Let the yeast settle at room temp, then pitch just the slurry.
5. Pitch entire starter directly from stir plate.

All of these work, and people practice every option. Generally, people will say that 3 is better than 4, but I'm not sure if anyone knows exactly what the difference is, in number of yeast cells.

Not sure why 3 would be any different than 5.

To the OP, the advantage of cold crashing is it gets rid of nasty spent starter wort. There is no right or wrong way, but if you have the time, I think cold crashing is worth it.

Best to decant while it is still cold so it takes less time to warm up. Then let the yeast layer warm to fermenting temp before pitching. You do NOT want to pitch the yeast while still cold as the warmer wort will shock them.
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Old 08-27-2012, 02:10 PM   #6
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I have only made one starter so far. What i did was smack the pack before i went to bed. In the morning (7 am) i made my starter wort cooled it to room temp and pitched my yeast in. I let that ferment until around 5 pm the next day when i pitched it to my room temp batch and then chilled it down in n swamp cooler. by 5 pm the next day i had a solid fermentation going on a 60 degree wort
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Old 08-28-2012, 04:29 PM   #7
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Pablo has it right. No difference in 3 or 5, except it takes longer to wait for the yeast to settle. Makes no difference if you pitch the whole thing anyway.
You always want the yeast at the same temperature as the wort. You also need to keep in mind that the starter wort probably is not very tasty, so pitching only the yeast is a good idea.
Cold crashing causes the yeast to go dormant and settle, so this helps you separate out what you don't want.
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Old 08-31-2012, 05:20 PM   #8
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How long can you keep the "crashed" starter in the fridge before needing to pitch it?
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Old 08-31-2012, 06:57 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gkeusch View Post
How long can you keep the "crashed" starter in the fridge before needing to pitch it?
Best way to tell is just look at the viability on a site like Mr Malty. You can go a week or so with little change in viability.
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Old 01-04-2014, 05:38 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Starderup View Post
Pablo has it right. No difference in 3 or 5, except it takes longer to wait for the yeast to settle. Makes no difference if you pitch the whole thing anyway.
You always want the yeast at the same temperature as the wort. You also need to keep in mind that the starter wort probably is not very tasty, so pitching only the yeast is a good idea.
Cold crashing causes the yeast to go dormant and settle, so this helps you separate out what you don't want.
Old post bump...

FWIW, it can be argued that cold crashing allows the yeast to rebuild glycogen reserves thereby providing stores for healthy aerobic reproduction phase.


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