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Old 08-26-2012, 02:03 PM   #1
UKFreak
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OK, about to date myself here, but back in the 70's the real "King of Beers" in retail America was Stroh's fire brewed. While similar to Bud and Miller, it had a very distinctive flavor. The company went bankrupt in the late 70's-early 80's. Miller bought the patent, then released it a few years ago as a cheap beer (much to the dismay of those of us who got our high-school drunk on with the good stuff) without the fire-brewing process and with a decidedly different taste. Does anyone know of a recipe for the old-style Stroh's? Old farts everywhere would appreciate the knowledge! PEACE OUT!


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Old 08-26-2012, 02:06 PM   #2
AndrewD
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This is from the wiki:

Quote:
Bernhard Stroh's original beer selling operation consisted of a basement brewing operation and was then sold door-to-door in a wheelbarrow. The New Beer (Stroh's) sold door-to-door is a lighter-lager beer, brewed in copper kettles; copper kettles enhanced the rich flavor of the beer, promoting carmelization of the wort "while the fire brewed distilling made the beer lighter", thus forming a tradition of 'pure water beers' without the heavier mineral content. Making the "new beer" lighter did not reduce the flavor.
Bernhard Stroh Jr. took charge of the brewery on the death of his father. He changed the brewery's name to the B. Stroh Brewing Company. With the introduction of pasteurization and refrigerated rail cars, Stroh was able to ship some of his beer as far as Florida and Massachusetts. In 1893 Stroh Bohemian Beer won a blue ribbon at the Columbian Exposition. The company's name was changed to The Stroh Brewery Company in 1902. In 1908 Bernhard Stroh's brother Julius Stroh took over the brewery. After a tour of famous European breweries, he introduced the European fire-brewing method in the Stroh brewery. Common in Europe before World War I, the fire-brewing process uses a direct flame rather than steam to heat beer-filled copper kettles. The company claims that the resulting higher temperatures bring out more of the beer's flavor.
So most of us are "fire-brewing" already. No clue about the recipe though.



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Old 08-27-2012, 12:52 PM   #3
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One selling point Stroh's used with their "fire brewing" was krausening:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Krausening
Sorry, I have no recipe, I just remember the commercials.
Regards, GF.

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Old 08-27-2012, 01:13 PM   #4
UKFreak
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Good info! Thanks yall!
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Old 08-27-2012, 01:19 PM   #5
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There's some discussions on other forums, especially the Michigan based ones....

Here's the best info from one of them....It's a good start if you know anything about recipe creation...

Quote:
According to a few web searches, I notice it is 4.6% abv, with 12 g. carbohydrates. It is apparently a corn-adjunct beer. I would try the following:

Shoot for an OG of 1.048, FG 1.012

Use 70% 2-row, 30% flaked corn, if you are an all-grain brewer

Bitter with Hallertau, or similar to about 12 IBUs (approx. 1 oz. of 4% alpha hops) Maybe use 1/4 oz saaz finishing hops

I'd try wyeast 2035, or 2124

If all-grain brewing, I would use a soft water profile.
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Old 10-22-2012, 07:32 PM   #6
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Great! Thanks Rev! That clicks with some of what I've found, too, but most use more of the Czech Saaz hops & based it on Bavarian pilsner grain mixes. Lookin to try a modified bohemian pilsner kit (partial mash) to see how that works, then try an all grain. Good info!
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Old 10-23-2012, 10:47 AM   #7
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Interesting discussion. This is what got me into home brewing to start with. I wanted to make beer the way it used to be. With that good beer flavor...that's the only way I can remember to describe it. Flavor & mouthfeel were increased in those days vs now. It had more of what made beer taste good. Not sweet,not bitter,not dry. It's something in the balance as well that made that flavor.
UK freak,it sounds like we are of a like mind on this. I just got into partial mash,so this could get interesting. I also have been re-examining info I've looked up for these certain hops that were said to produce a "crisp" flavor quality. I do believe this could help the flavor profile,as it is one of those "balancing" qualities I mentioned. Just haven't found them yet. Gotta find the hop site I was on when I read it. That's what I get for not making note of it the first time. I think it's another piece of the puzzle. I used to love the old stroh's beer. But always laughed at the "fire brewed" bragging bit. I used to think as a teen drinkin it "well duh,ya need fire to heat the kettle you brew it in!" Always thought it ws just marketing dept hype. Didn't know steam heating was commonly used. So Yeeeaaa! I'm makin fire brewed beer!!
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Old 10-25-2012, 12:07 AM   #8
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Actually, most of the research I've done seems to point toward Czech Saaz as the hops most commonly associated with the "Bohemian-style" beers, which is what Stroh's billed itself as. Most of what I'm reading suggests that the original Strohs was a traditional Bohemian/Czech pilsner, with a slightly Americanized taste, maybe developed using flaked corn or rice syrup to make it more suitable to American palates. I've come up with something in a partial mash that I'm gonna try and see how it turns out. If it works, great. I may tweak it a bit...or a lot....but I'll keep posting on here as I experiment with it. I'm still really new to this, but had great fun and success with an Amber Ale (me and my buds damn near wiped out the entire batch on the day I brought it out for the first time! LOL)But I'm really excited to start playing around with recipes of my own. Watch for more details!
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Old 10-25-2012, 07:31 PM   #9
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I'll be watching! I may even give this a shot myself.

 
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Old 10-25-2012, 08:07 PM   #10
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Not that it matters to the topic but, they did not go bankrupt in the 70 or 80's. My dad worked at the Detroit plant until it closed in 84-85. They only closed it because they had bought out Schlitz and the Detroit plant was 135 years old so they moved production to the Schlitz plant. They stayed a family owned company until 2000 when they where bought out by Pabst brewing company and Miller brewing company. Not sure if it taste the same these days but you can still get it in Michigan.

From one beer lover to another


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