Helles Bock "Hellofa Beer" - Bock Maibock/Hellesbock - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > HomeBrewTalk.com Recipe Database > Homebrew Lager Recipes > Helles Bock "Hellofa Beer" - Bock Maibock/Hellesbock

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-25-2012, 04:18 PM   #1
dlester
Recipes 
 
Nov 2007
Los Angeles, CA, CA
Posts: 558
Liked 36 Times on 34 Posts


Recipe Type: All Grain   
Yeast: WYeast 2206 Bavarian Lager   
Yeast Starter: 2000 MG   
Batch Size (Gallons): 11   
Original Gravity: 1.07   
Final Gravity: 1.017   
IBU: 28%   
Boiling Time (Minutes): 90   
Color: 3.2 light   
Primary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp): 30 @ 50   
Secondary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp): 14 @ 35   
Tasting Notes: Light, slightly malty and sweet with balanced hops. See tasting notes below   

Name: Hellofa Beer

Style: Bock Maibock/Hellesbock



Notes:
---------------
This is a really good beer, strong malty base with balanced hops. Tastes very good, and is in fact, my favorite, malty and high alcohol (6.25% to 7% depending on mash efficiency). I would put this up against any commercial beer. Definitely a candidate for a competition..

This all grain recipe requires a decoction, but you can boil 1/2 gallon down until condensed at boil instead. I will post an extract version, which you can add an extra pound of grain that can be boiled to give the same effect as an all grain.

IMPORTANT: After brewing this multiple times (see blog). Part of the success of this beer is the water profile listed below and yeast. If you compromise this part, you'll compromise the taste (see below). I used Mr. Malty's Yeast Calculator and calculated two viles of yeast in a 1/2 to 1 gallon starter. This along with using RO Water and Gypsum gave the beer the perfect dryness you find in a Bock Beer.

PS. My brewery pumps out a constant efficiency of 82%. If you are not sure of your efficiency, assume 65% to 75%. This means that if you use my recipe "as-is," you'll get an ABV that is less than 7%, and most likely around 6.5%, which is actually a perfect ABV in my opinion.

Good Luck.

Recipe Specifics
----------------
Batch Size (Gal): 11.00 Wort Size (Gal): 11.00
Total Grain (Lbs): 25.50
Anticipated OG: 1.070 Plato: 17.03
Anticipated SRM: 3.2
Anticipated IBU: 27.6
Brewhouse Efficiency: 82 %
Wort Boil Time: 90 Minutes

Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
------------------------------------------------------------------
94.1 24.00 lbs. Pilsener (Weyermann) Germany 1.037 1
5.9 1.50 lbs. CaraPils Dextrine Malt USA 1.033 2

Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-------------------------------------------------------------------
0.50 oz. Magnum Pellet 13.10 13.3 60 min.
2.00 oz. Czech Saaz Pellet 3.50 14.3 60 min.
Note: Magnum is cheaper (higher IBU) and neutral in flavor. Saaz is the flavor compound.
However, is lower in IBU, which requires a higher volume and higher cost. You can go all
Czech Saaz if you would like. The hop flavor will come through slightly more.

Yeast
-----
German Bock or Helles Bock Yeast x2 plus added to a 1/2 to 1 gallon starter.

Water Profile
-------------
RO (Reverse Osmosis) Water
2 Tsp Gypsum (1 Tsp per 5-6 gallon), or 50 PPM.

Mashing
Mash-out Rest Temp: 154 Time: 60 See mash notes
Sparge Temp: 170 Time: 45

I like to dough in at 133F and raise the wart to Mash temps to help clarify the beer, but you don't have to do this step.

Mash Notes
----------
Mash at 154F for 60 minutes
Sparge at 170

Time to boil: After a complete sparge, take out 1/2 gallon of wort, bring to a boil until it starts to condense, however don't burn it. This will replicate the decoction mashing used in this style.
Boil wort 90 Minutes with hop additions while cooking down the 1/2 gallon of wort pulled and boiled for decoction replication.


Fermentation Notes
------------------
Place your cooled wort and yeast starter in the fridge at about 45. When the wort and yeast have cooled to 45 combine the wort and yeast.
Reset your temp controller to 50 and allow the temp to rise to 50. This step will avoid diacetyl production, which will make your beer taste like an ale (buttery flavors).
7-10 days at 50F or until final gravity of approximately 1.017-1.018.
Slowly move your temp up to 65F for adiacetyl rest (this step will remove small amounts of diacetyl). Hold for 3 days.
28-30F for 30 days: Slowly move your temp down a couple degrees every few hours until you reach the assigned temperature. DO NOT "crash" the temp down, you will kill the yeast (Value $12.00). The yeast will continue to work, but slowly, during this time period.
15-30 days hold for Lagering period.
Fermentation complete.



 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2012, 11:56 PM   #2
dlester
Recipes 
 
Nov 2007
Los Angeles, CA, CA
Posts: 558
Liked 36 Times on 34 Posts


Competition results:

This won Silver at the recent 2012 ASH Oktoberfest Homebrew Competition out of nine entries. One judge wanted more hops, but that was just one opinion of two. However, with that said, I'm going to make some changes for the next competition.

Changes:

I am going to try original gravity of 1.065 and 1.060 with the same 25 IBU to see if I can get a Gold out of this recipe.

My reasoning is that although this beer is supposed to be malty, I want to tone it down, and bring up the hop bitterness a bit.



 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2014, 06:22 AM   #3
SnowRaven
Recipes 
 
Jan 2014
Posts: 118
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts


Any further work done on this?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2014, 04:35 PM   #4
dlester
Recipes 
 
Nov 2007
Los Angeles, CA, CA
Posts: 558
Liked 36 Times on 34 Posts


Yes, thanks for asking. Check out my Beer Blog "Quest for the Holy Grail of Beers." I finally got the dryness required for this type of beer by using the correct volume and type of yeast. The key is the yeast. You need to make a starter with 2 packets/vials. I used the Mr. Malty's yeast calculator (google it) to determine the correct amount of yeast. That my friend, was my key to a correctly made Bock.


Cheers,

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2014, 02:42 AM   #5
SnowRaven
Recipes 
 
Jan 2014
Posts: 118
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by dlester View Post
Yes, thanks for asking. Check out my Beer Blog "Quest for the Holy Grail of Beers." I finally got the dryness required for this type of beer by using the correct volume and type of yeast. The key is the yeast. You need to make a starter with 2 packets/vials. I used the Mr. Malty's yeast calculator (google it) to determine the correct amount of yeast. That my friend, was my key to a correctly made Bock.


Cheers,

My end goal is to make a batch close to Spaten's

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2014, 04:28 AM   #6
dlester
Recipes 
 
Nov 2007
Los Angeles, CA, CA
Posts: 558
Liked 36 Times on 34 Posts


That's a great beer

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2014, 07:20 PM   #7
FatsSchindee
Recipes 
 
Mar 2013
Austin, TX
Posts: 358
Liked 26 Times on 24 Posts


I'm getting ready to brew a Maibock, and am looking into water treatment with RO water, like you did.

In your first post, during the discussion of it above the recipe, you say you used CaCl... However, in the recipe itself, you say to use Gypsum (CaSO4)... Which is it? (or both?) I'm guessing CaCl, since that enhances maltiness, whereas Gypsum enhances bitterness.
Thanks for the clarification! Looks like a great beer...
__________________
"All right, brain. You don't like me and I don't like you, but let's just do this and I can get back to killing you with beer."
- Homer Simpson

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2014, 03:39 AM   #8
dlester
Recipes 
 
Nov 2007
Los Angeles, CA, CA
Posts: 558
Liked 36 Times on 34 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by FatsSchindee View Post
I'm getting ready to brew a Maibock, and am looking into water treatment with RO water, like you did.

In your first post, during the discussion of it above the recipe, you say you used CaCl... However, in the recipe itself, you say to use Gypsum (CaSO4)... Which is it? (or both?) I'm guessing CaCl, since that enhances maltiness, whereas Gypsum enhances bitterness.
Thanks for the clarification! Looks like a great beer...
The recipe is part of my search to make the perfect Maibock. I started with RO and CaCl, but it was too soft and malty sweet. I changed to RO water and Gypsum and think it's perfect. I won second place with the Calcium Chloride, but prefer the Gypsum. You get a real nice dryness found in a bock. I use 3 grams or 2 teaspoons per 5-6 gallons.

You can read my trials and errors on my blog. Look for "Helles Bock - My Quest for the Holy Grail of Beer."


Good Luck, and Cheers

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2014, 03:47 AM   #9
dlester
Recipes 
 
Nov 2007
Los Angeles, CA, CA
Posts: 558
Liked 36 Times on 34 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by FatsSchindee View Post
I'm getting ready to brew a Maibock, and am looking into water treatment with RO water, like you did.

In your first post, during the discussion of it above the recipe, you say you used CaCl... However, in the recipe itself, you say to use Gypsum (CaSO4)... Which is it? (or both?) I'm guessing CaCl, since that enhances maltiness, whereas Gypsum enhances bitterness.
Thanks for the clarification! Looks like a great beer...
Thank's FatsSchinee for the heads up on the water chemistry conflict. I found the error and fixed it.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2014, 04:36 AM   #10
FatsSchindee
Recipes 
 
Mar 2013
Austin, TX
Posts: 358
Liked 26 Times on 24 Posts


Thanks for the clarification. I was leaning toward adding both, with about a 2:1 ratio of CaCl to gypsum... Might have to reconsider that now!

Also, I'm toying with the idea of a single decoction as well. Never done one. You said you took it out at about forty minutes, and then brought to a boil. Did you wait and put it back in toward the end, and did that raise the total mash temp up for a mash out? You also mentioned keeping the mash at 154 for 60 minutes, so just wondering how you did that with the decoction...

Thanks for the info!


__________________
"All right, brain. You don't like me and I don't like you, but let's just do this and I can get back to killing you with beer."
- Homer Simpson

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Helles Bock MY Bock (Americanized Maibock)- Extract Yooper Homebrew Lager Recipes 21 07-12-2016 11:21 AM
Helles Bock "Hellofa Beer" - Bock Maibock/Hellesbock dlester Homebrew Lager Recipes 1 11-14-2012 11:55 PM
Helles Bock Not your Bock Maibock bbarr21 Homebrew Lager Recipes 2 01-13-2012 12:20 PM
Belgian Candi Sugar to Maibock / Helles Bock ? ultravista General Beer Discussion 11 11-04-2011 05:22 AM
Aging a Maibock/Helles Bock, the EndGame... xinunix Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 0 01-17-2010 02:27 AM


Forum Jump