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Old 12-26-2012, 08:53 PM   #21
Dirty25
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Jul 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skw View Post
I'm a German homebrewer, and I'm not the only one. If you speak any German, there's a forum here: http://hobbybrauer.de/ Even without any German knowledge, there are enough of us who speak some English to help you out nonetheless.

I am not aware of physical homebrew stores, but there are several mailorder companies that should give you most of the supplies. Some things tend to be done slightly different than in the US, for example BIAB, ice chest mashing or glass carboys are rare, but there's certainly nothing stopping you from continuing your hobby in metric.
No carboys? How do you guys ferment then? I am moving to Germany in March and am not giving up my carboys and imperial measurements!

 
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Old 12-26-2012, 08:55 PM   #22
Dirty25
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Originally Posted by robm184 View Post
Actually I think the German post system is probably the best in the entire world, It might just be the HBS I order from but I never received anything later than two days, from order date, and no more than about 10 euros for delivery. Got everything in the picture delivered for 10,05 and hops I put in my freezer. Also they sell American hops. The distance is about an hour North of Munich but you would have to travel if you are not comfortable with the German post system but very difficult to get anything other than Belgian, Pilsner or German traditional but not necessarily a bad thing
What place did you order from? Still looking for some mail order places when I get over there.

 
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Old 12-26-2012, 09:54 PM   #23
Odin_Brews
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Nov 2011
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30 Liter plastic buckets are common for fermenting, but glass carboys are equally reasonable to find.
check out out hobbybrauerversand.de Im not familiar with that shop as im in Switzerland, but Usually you can arrange (by appointment) to go pick up your order at the shop and have a look around as well. I would guess if you post on hobbybrauer.de you'll find quite a few shops around online (I know of 4 in Swiss and it's a much smaller country). And then you may have to order from diffeerent shops for different hops. THis http://www.brewstock.com/brewstockbrewing.html I found super useful for making more american and english recipes with Weyeremann equivalent malts.

Cheers

Almost forgot, I've found the same equipment (particularly carboys) for much lower prices by going to a shop selling basic farm supplies.

 
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Old 12-26-2012, 10:19 PM   #24
skw
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Nov 2012
, Germany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirty25

No carboys? How do you guys ferment then? I am moving to Germany in March and am not giving up my carboys and imperial measurements!
Hardware stores and mail order have plastic fermenters in all sizes. Homemade cider is common, at least here in the south.
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Old 12-27-2012, 09:25 AM   #25

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No carboys? How do you guys ferment then? I am moving to Germany in March and am not giving up my carboys and imperial measurements!
I'm not in Germany, rather Croatia. You might be able to find some demijohns, though. They're like carboys but better, IMHO. They come with a plastic holder which is quite nice. A bit rounder shape. They're from Italy and come in 10, 15, 20, 25, 34 and 50 something liters size.

Like so:





As for Imperial units, I use a mixed system myself. I use Fahrenheit as it's more precise. But grams are much better for hop additions rather than all these weird fractions of ounces. And it's easy to get used to using liters and kilos/grams for grains. If you end up hanging out with locals, they'll understand what you're talking about when you talk recipes. And metric just makes sense. 1 liter of water = 1 kg. For starters, use 100 grams of DME for 1 liter of starter. Nice.
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Old 12-27-2012, 11:31 AM   #26
Odin_Brews
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Maybe you already speak german but those demijohns Matt pictured are called 'glasballons' and my beer supplier has them under the wine category.

+1 to metric!

 
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Old 12-27-2012, 06:54 PM   #27
robm184
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Jun 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirty25 View Post
What place did you order from? Still looking for some mail order places when I get over there.
ludwigs-sudhaus.de/

I use this guy and he is pretty reliable oh I forgot to mention he is a vendor for wyeast

And the person that mention the wine glass carboy, I actually like them much better than the American glass carboys. > dehner.de < has them in Germany

Metric +1!!!! I use grams for my hop additions just like the guy said much more precise.

and if you ever get into kegging> knorr.de < fills tanks... and has high temp tubing

 
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Old 01-06-2013, 04:13 PM   #28
lylo
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Mar 2011
Lacombe, Alberta
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I will be going to Germany at the end of March and would really like to see the Speidel Factory. I have searched High and low but can't seem to find an address. I am actually considering bring back a 20L BM with me. Does anyone have any experience with this?
I am in Western Canada.
Thanks
Lylo

 
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Old 01-06-2013, 09:24 PM   #29
SVB
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Dec 2012
Lakewood, Colorado
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I lived in germany for 2 years, i did not homebrew while I was there but picked up the hobby when I came back to the states because I missed the German brews so badly.
Go, even if you find homebrewing difficult. Beer is cheep and much more ingrained in the culture. Its generally very good quality and available anywhere.
Take your equipment, when you get there find the nearest breweries (Almost every town has its own small brewery) and inquire if they would be willing to sell you malt and hops, that would take care of most of your needs. Mail order the rest.

 
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