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Old 08-25-2012, 02:08 PM   #1
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Oct 2011
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I have until next Monday to tell my boss if I accept the relocation package from the US to Frankfurt, Germany.

Can anyone share their experiences home brewing in Germany?



 
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Old 08-25-2012, 02:15 PM   #2

Some German film students visited here last fall and did a documentary on one of my brew days. They were amazed by Canadian homebrewing; saying it was next to non-existent (maybe even illegal without a license) in Germany. Not the most reliable of sources, but FWIW.

Living in Germany would be pretty cool, though. Was to Munich for a week a few years ago and loved it. Permanent move or something you can do for awhile then decide?


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Old 08-25-2012, 02:25 PM   #3
VolFan
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Congrats on the job opportunity. Can't help you with Germany, but I moved to France in April for a 2 year assignment and have been homebrewing since then in the land of wine. I have not found a single homebrew shop in the entire country. Since I can't get good beer here (except belgians), bringing the equipment over was a requirement. I had to downsize from 10 gallon batches in a keggle to brewing 3 gallon batches in the kitchen, but I have a kegerator full of beer now. Just brewed a Rye IPA today in fact... I brought about 5 lbs of different american hops with me and various dry and liquid yeasts. I mail order all my grain from Belgium and harvest the yeast for subsequent batches. Since downsizing was a requirement, I brought four 3 gallon kegs and 3 and 5 gallon fermentors to make smaller batches. You shouldn't have a problem getting ingredients in Germany, and mail order works pretty well once you get everything figured out. The hardest thing for me to get was CO2, they wouldn't ship my bottles and I wouldn't be able to fill them here anyway with the US standard fittings...

 
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Old 08-25-2012, 02:30 PM   #4
cheezydemon3
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Is the rheinsebegot actually a law? (presuming that you can brew)

 
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Old 08-25-2012, 02:37 PM   #5
ArcaneXor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheezydemon3 View Post
Is the rheinsebegot actually a law? (presuming that you can brew)
It hasn't been a law since the '80s, and doesn't affect home brewing. As far as I know (based on the German Wikipedia - for what it's worth) you need to track your brews to report to the taxing authorities (in same cases ahead of each brew, in some cases once per calendar year), but they won't charge you anything unless you go over 200 liters a year - after that you have to pay regular beer taxes. Some may stop by and inspect your brewery. And I don't know if homebrewers actually worry about this in practice.

 
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Old 08-25-2012, 04:06 PM   #6
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Thanks everyone... I am making a giant mind map of the positives and negatives of the move, something like this is a big decision and will be the next three years of my life.

It does appear that home brewing exists which is a big positive.

 
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Old 08-25-2012, 04:35 PM   #7
bottlebomber
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I would probably consider hanging up homebrewing for an opportunity like that..

 
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Old 08-25-2012, 04:41 PM   #8
cheezydemon3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bottlebomber View Post
I would probably consider hanging up homebrewing for an opportunity like that..
AGREED.


Really, the time spent brewing could be spent touring abbeys or breweries.

HELL, I would see if I couldn't volunteer at a german brewery or get paid to do anything short of just sweeping the floor.

 
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Old 08-25-2012, 04:42 PM   #9
dinnerstick
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i'm sure there are suppliers on the sad side of the border but for sure the big belgian homebrew supplier (brouwland) ships to germany no problem. i know for a fact that the german authorities will check moustache girth and twirl before issuing a permit

 
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Old 08-25-2012, 04:50 PM   #10
Obliviousbrew
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Homebrewing itīs legal in Germany, but there is some paperwork and a limit of 200l per year free of tax, after that you supouse to pay taxes but who is going to tell you that you brewed more?
Here is a link from speidel (the oneīs that manufacture the Braumeister) that explains this a little more:
http://www.speidels-braumeister.de/L...ters:_:30.html
I donīt live in Germany but I have bougth some things in German websites
This is the one that I use and haves a good variety at ok prices:
http://www.candirect.de/
THe German site itīs better than the english even they are the same company the selection seems bigger in german.



 
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