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Old 07-28-2007, 02:22 AM   #1
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Default Yeast Layer

I was reading the online book by Palmer, and he was talking about the yeast layer in the bottom of the bottle. He said that you have to be careful when you pour your home brew, not to disrupt the yeast.

So the question is, will every homebrew i make have a undrinkable portion of the bottle or is their exceptions to this?

Any experiences in this situation?


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Old 07-28-2007, 02:25 AM   #2
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If you bottle carbonate, you will always have that yeast layer. Sometimes, if you use a highly flocculate yeast, it will be a very tightly compacted layer and super easy to pour off. If you let any beer sit for a period of time, it'll be like that. I've "perfected" it so that I actually only "lose" about 1/4 or much less of beer/sediment.


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Old 07-28-2007, 02:27 AM   #3
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As you get better there should be a smaller layer of yeast. Mine has become a thin "film" on the bottom that does not cause too much beer to be wasted when pouring.

I did, however, brew my first beer without using a secondary, and there is A LOT of "crap" floating around!!!

I do NOT recommend NOT using a secondary...get it?
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Old 07-28-2007, 02:27 AM   #4
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Unless you filter your beer and force carbonate your bottles, you'll always get a yeast layer. The yeast that carbonates your beer eventually settles out.

You can minimize the layer somewhat by using a secondary.
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Old 07-28-2007, 02:51 AM   #5
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I have the secondary.

What do major companies that sell beer in stores do to prevent the yeast layer?
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Old 07-28-2007, 03:01 AM   #6
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EDIT: Whoops. they filter their beer.
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Old 07-28-2007, 03:06 AM   #7
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How do they filter it?

Is it possible for a homebrewer to do so?

What all would be involved in doing so?
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Old 07-28-2007, 03:14 AM   #8
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you could use a secondary and cold condition to minimize and you could possibly filter if you were using a keg, but to bottle, you need viable yeast in the bottle or it won't carbonate.

not all yeast is that gross. i sometimes pour the whole thing in and just let the it settle in my glass

you pretty much pour the entire beer out anyway, just pour slowly and it will stay at the bottom of the bottle and you'll still get 99% of your brew...not really a big deal
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Old 07-28-2007, 03:14 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kash
How do they filter it?
With something like this.

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Old 07-28-2007, 03:25 AM   #10
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Yeast is good for you. Personally I don' worry to much about it but as others have posted you can minimize it by a long secondary/conditioning stage, 3+ weeks in the bottle, use a good flocculating yeast and practice your pour.


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