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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Hops at flameout instead of dry hopping?
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:17 PM   #1
velorider11
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Default Hops at flameout instead of dry hopping?

Hi, I'm planning on doing an extract 3Floyd's Zombie Dust clone for a friends party in September and it calls for dry hopping naturally but I don't have time to do that and have it carb in the bottles by party time. If I put the extra Citra hops in at flameout instead of dryhopping, could I expect some decent aroma from them? Would this be a decent compromise or am I better off just brewing something different? I really want to have this ready by the party and if I can get close, that's alright by me. Thanks in advance.


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Old 08-23-2012, 08:29 PM   #2
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Sure, you could also put the hops in the fermenter. All three techniques result in slightly different aroma profiles, none of them bad.


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Old 08-23-2012, 08:40 PM   #3
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When in September? You can get a great dry hop in 2-3 days. Give it 5 days to ferment, dry hop as the yeast drops, bottle on day 8-10, ready to drink by day 20ish?

Flameout hops are great, but different as David said. You'll lose a good portion of the aroma during fermentation. No substitute for a dry hop in my opinion.
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:47 PM   #4
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Thanks but I'd rather give it about 10 days in the fermenter to completely ferment and clean up so I definitely won't be dry hopping. So if I can get some of the effect of the dryhopping by using a large flameout addition of the Citra hops, I'll do it.
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:49 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velorider11 View Post
Thanks but I'd rather give it about 10 days in the fermenter to completely ferment and clean up so I definitely won't be dry hopping. So if I can get some of the effect of the dryhopping by using a large flameout addition of the Citra hops, I'll do it.
Right, and I'm suggesting just adding your dry hops at day 7, right in the primary. It works, I promise.
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:54 PM   #6
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I've done a few batches of Zombie Dust. I recommend dry hopping. The aroma is the best part of the beer.

I found that it takes about 6 weeks to get really good. I usually do 3-4 weeks in primary, dry hop in primary for 1 week, keg, force carb, and keg condition for 1-2 weeks. It can be a little harsh early on. The older it gets the more it mellows.
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Old 08-23-2012, 09:16 PM   #7
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Right, and I'm suggesting just adding your dry hops at day 7, right in the primary. It works, I promise.
This. If you're fermenting with healthy yeast and temperature control, no way it should be taking longer than 7 days. 2-3 days dry hopping, and you'll be golden.

Flame out works too, but since the hops are hitting the wort at 210 degrees, you're going to get a very different utilization than hitting the beer at 70 degrees in your carboy.
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Old 08-23-2012, 09:21 PM   #8
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If you do go the flame-out route, I would get the wort down to 150ish, then add your flameout hops, then chill slowly over 30mins or so down to pitching temp. The warm-but-not-boiling gives you tons of flavor extraction wihtout boiling away the delicate hop oils.
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:09 PM   #9
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i recently make a hop tea using a new coffee press and the hop aroma/flavor was the best i've ever had in any of my beers. it was a kegged beer but it should work right in the bottling bucket too.
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Old 08-26-2012, 01:15 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TyTanium
If you do go the flame-out route, I would get the wort down to 150ish, then add your flameout hops, then chill slowly over 30mins or so down to pitching temp. The warm-but-not-boiling gives you tons of flavor extraction wihtout boiling away the delicate hop oils.
I've been doing some research on flameout addition vs. dry hopping, and found some interesting things.... Tytanium is, IMO, on the right track with flameout additions. Cooling the wort down to about 140 and then adding the flameout addition while covering the pot for 20-30 minutes will get you great results.

Reason for this is because when you cover the pot, no volatile compounds can escape with the steam, leaving in those aroma compounds. That is the dumbed down science behind it and thats how i interpreted it in a nutshell.

fwiw, I know when I have done normal flameout additions in my past brews, with the cover off and right at about 210, I havent gotten much hop aroma and have been disappointed with the aroma in some of my brews, so I will most definitely do it this way from now. Of course you only do this to style.


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