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Old 08-23-2012, 01:14 PM   #11
passedpawn
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I have a glass-top stove (big mistake when we re-built the kitchen). These types of stoves are a problem for pressure canners.

The presto says it's OK to use on smooth surface cooktops. That one is far lighter than the All-American, and I think it's bottom surface is stepped so that the pot doesn't contact the "non-burner" area of the cooktop.

The All-American has big warnings on their website that one shouldn't use it on a stove like mine. I could use it over my propane burner, but since I went to electric brewing a few years ago, I'd love to leave that burner buried in the attic.

So, the presto might just be the better solution for me.
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Old 08-23-2012, 02:29 PM   #12
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Passedpawn, the purpose of the step is to bring the bottom of the canner into contact with the stove top, not to avoid contact with the non-burner areas. Cautions about using a pot or pan on a smooth top burner have to do with the possibility of putting a minute scratch on the glass cooking top. That's not good at all for the cooking surface, as it produces a stress riser that may lead to shattering the top of the stove.

 
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Old 08-23-2012, 03:01 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckO View Post
Passedpawn, the purpose of the step is to bring the bottom of the canner into contact with the stove top, not to avoid contact with the non-burner areas. Cautions about using a pot or pan on a smooth top burner have to do with the possibility of putting a minute scratch on the glass cooking top. That's not good at all for the cooking surface, as it produces a stress riser that may lead to shattering the top of the stove.
So the minute scratch would occur because of the weight of the pot? How is this any different than what might happen from a normal boil pot?
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Old 08-23-2012, 03:10 PM   #14
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For some reason a pot with a raised rim is more likely to scratch the stove top than one with a totally flat bottom and radiused corners. The raised rim also reduces the contact area and possibly eliminates it, reducing heat transfer ability. This might be the real reason, the stove top gets overheated because of the air gap to the bottom of the pot.

I guess that I'm fortunate, I have both kinds of electric stoves here. Still wish that we had natural gas though.

 
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Old 08-23-2012, 03:13 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckO View Post
I guess that I'm fortunate, I have both kinds of electric stoves here. Still wish that we had natural gas though.
NG was just run up the main street past my neighborhood. Several neighbors have converted. I'm jealous, but I spend a fortune gutting my kitchen a few years ago and I don't want to do that again.
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Old 08-23-2012, 03:39 PM   #16
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The only true requirement is to ensure you buy one with the ability to tap into the steam and do a steam infusion mash.


In all seriousness, bigger is better and I wish I had gotten one like that All-American one when I purchased a smaller pressure canner that requires many "batches" to get through the annual tomato or jam canning sessions.
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Old 08-23-2012, 03:59 PM   #17
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We've got that Presto unit, just used it over the weekend to can 10 pints of heirloom tomatoes out of the garden. We've had it for 3 years now, works like a charm. The all American unit is probably a better unit but I'm not going to be doing any major canning production runs.

 
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Old 08-23-2012, 03:59 PM   #18
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For what it's worth, my wife has two of the presto's and uses them a TON every year. Think she did 30+ quarts of green beans this year with my MIL. If our tomatoes ever ripen, she's going to be doing a lot of those too. Anyhow, she's never had any issues with hers. There is a Presto rep that comes each year to a local store here and does free inspections of people's canners. If something needs repaired or replaced they do the work right there, you just have to buy the material needed. This includes gauge calibration, testing the seal and inspecting the whole surface. Good customer support imo.

 
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Old 08-23-2012, 04:26 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IXVolt View Post
For what it's worth, my wife has two of the presto's and uses them a TON every year. Think she did 30+ quarts of green beans this year with my MIL. If our tomatoes ever ripen, she's going to be doing a lot of those too. Anyhow, she's never had any issues with hers. There is a Presto rep that comes each year to a local store here and does free inspections of people's canners. If something needs repaired or replaced they do the work right there, you just have to buy the material needed. This includes gauge calibration, testing the seal and inspecting the whole surface. Good customer support imo.
Yea, I'll probably get the Presto, but it kills me to buy one that's made in China when there is a better model that's made here in the US.
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Old 08-23-2012, 04:35 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passedpawn View Post
Yea, I'll probably get the Presto, but it kills me to buy one that's made in China when there is a better model that's made here in the US.
Then buy the American one and pull out your burner.

We do most of our canning outside or in the garage so we don't heat up the house.

 
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