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Old 09-01-2012, 02:23 AM   #21
snortwheeze
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vox

Wine kits at my lhbs are like 150.00
Wine kit??? I'm new and even I know that you buy some straight up grape juice, add sugar till your hydrometer says "desert wine" add a wine yeast and let it go! Shouldn't be too hard to make a wine and let it sit.....


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Old 09-01-2012, 04:41 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snortwheeze

Wine kit??? I'm new and even I know that you buy some straight up grape juice, add sugar till your hydrometer says "desert wine" add a wine yeast and let it go! Shouldn't be too hard to make a wine and let it sit.....
Not hard to make wine. A good wine may be a different story.


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Old 09-01-2012, 06:33 PM   #23
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How long does this take start to finish?
For Skeeter Pee (thanks Lon) it's about a month from start to finish, if you use fining agents or don't mind drinking it slightly hazy.

I let it clear naturally, so that takes about 3 weeks extra, so just a 2 months.

I highly recommend it!
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Old 09-01-2012, 11:48 PM   #24
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So how long should I let a woodchuck clone age in the bottles before pasteurizing?
Sorry, but still kinda new to brewing in general.
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Old 09-02-2012, 09:57 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by alpha224
So how long should I let a woodchuck clone age in the bottles before pasteurizing?
Sorry, but still kinda new to brewing in general.
Only let the bottles sit long enough for the carbonation to get to your preferred level and then pasturise.
Once its pasteurized you can let it age for as long as you want without fear of exploding bottles (provided you did it properly).

Just gotta remember, the biggest reason you're pasteurizing is to kill the yeast and prevent them from producing more carbon dioxide, not (just) taste or anthing else like that. Although one of the other benefits of pasteurizing is that the yeast won't consume any further sugar once its dead so the sweetness level shouldn't change.
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Old 09-02-2012, 04:24 PM   #26
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Always a dilemma, empty carboys just look so lonely without precious cider bubbling away. However, I would say two things. If you just wasnt to expirement with a quick brew and something new, go for it. But don't tire up your bottles for long because... Secondly, it is finally apple season again. While any old apple juice will make alcohol, the best apples for cider usually ripen later. That means get ready to start some batches in the mid fall. If you have access to the fresh stuff from a local orchard fill those empty carboys in october-december depending upon where you live. At the very least try to leave one carboy empty for a true batch from good raw cider. Remember that the best spokes for cider are generally the worst to eat (plenty of books on apple types).

Regardless what you do, don't let those thing sit empty for more than a few months our the wife will take over you basement cidery/brewery!

Make sure you have an outlet for all your work. You can only give so much away and drink so much yourself. So, dare I say, show a little constraint...but not much. I still found a way to brew and bottle ~50 gallons of cidery last season, and am busy planning this years batches.
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Old 09-04-2012, 08:36 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greghark
Always a dilemma, empty carboys just look so lonely without precious cider bubbling away. However, I would say two things. If you just wasnt to expirement with a quick brew and something new, go for it. But don't tire up your bottles for long because... Secondly, it is finally apple season again. While any old apple juice will make alcohol, the best apples for cider usually ripen later. That means get ready to start some batches in the mid fall. If you have access to the fresh stuff from a local orchard fill those empty carboys in october-december depending upon where you live. At the very least try to leave one carboy empty for a true batch from good raw cider. Remember that the best spokes for cider are generally the worst to eat (plenty of books on apple types).

Regardless what you do, don't let those thing sit empty for more than a few months our the wife will take over you basement cidery/brewery!

Make sure you have an outlet for all your work. You can only give so much away and drink so much yourself. So, dare I say, show a little constraint...but not much. I still found a way to brew and bottle ~50 gallons of cidery last season, and am busy planning this years batches.
I've only used store bought juice so far. I drove past Julian, CA and thought about stopping for fresh cider as they are a town known for cider. They in fact make Julian American Cider there that you can find at Whole Foods.

What questions should I ask the local orchards here in AZ? I know uv pasteurized is preferable. I thought I had read most orchards just make their cider from a mix of apples and can't confirm the exact types in any given batch of cider. I do have a book on the different types of apples and their flavors for cider. What else is good to ask?

On the bright side, the pub I go to regularly is going to give me cases of bottles whenever I want so I'm only limited by how many I can store lol.
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Old 09-04-2012, 08:54 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DoctorWho

For Skeeter Pee (thanks Lon) it's about a month from start to finish, if you use fining agents or don't mind drinking it slightly hazy.

I let it clear naturally, so that takes about 3 weeks extra, so just a 2 months.

I highly recommend it!
Do you use a degas-er of some nature? I contemplated making this in a bucket as the primary so I can stir it with something rather than buying a degas-ing drill attachment if I used a carboy as my primary since I don't need it for cider making.
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Old 09-05-2012, 12:28 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vox View Post
Do you use a degas-er of some nature? I contemplated making this in a bucket as the primary so I can stir it with something rather than buying a degas-ing drill attachment if I used a carboy as my primary since I don't need it for cider making.
I'm drinking an 8 week old skeeter pee right now. It's good!

I bought one of the degas-ers, but you don't have to. I think it helps, though, and I find myself using it for lots of things: stirring sugar into the skeeter pee later, mixing cider ingredients, aireating beer (instead of shaking it), even stirring my powdered sanitizer until it dissolves (and sanitizing the degassing wand at the same time). It's been a useful tool.
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Old 09-05-2012, 12:35 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tracyt1800

I'm drinking an 8 week old skeeter pee right now. It's good!

I bought one of the degas-ers, but you don't have to. I think it helps, though, and I find myself using it for lots of things: stirring sugar into the skeeter pee later, mixing cider ingredients, aireating beer (instead of shaking it), even stirring my powdered sanitizer until it dissolves (and sanitizing the degassing wand at the same time). It's been a useful tool.
Ok. I will contemplate getting one


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