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Old 09-20-2012, 02:52 AM   #11
muench1
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Jan 2012
Santa Cruz, CA
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Yeah I usually add pectic enzyme in primary, come to think of it. Not sure why it would go into the boil...


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Old 09-20-2012, 03:51 AM   #12
ChasidicCalvinist
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Feb 2012
Hookstown, PA
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BTW--congrats on the good beer! Always a worthy cause of celebration in the world of gluten free homebrew.


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Old 09-20-2012, 07:05 PM   #13
drchris83
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Jun 2012
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I live in a region where wine and cider making is prominent. Where I come from, pectic enzyme is used to maximize must extraction - what is it supposed to achieve in beer making?
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Old 09-20-2012, 07:13 PM   #14
frothdaddy
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Jul 2007
Miami Beach, FL
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Chestnuts are fruit, so it's a cloudy muddy mess when you rack to the primary. Pectic enzyme is supposed to help all of that drop out and clarify the brew ... whether it actually did that by adding it to the mash is another question.

 
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Old 01-17-2013, 09:35 PM   #15
frothdaddy
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Jul 2007
Miami Beach, FL
Posts: 106
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Quote:
Originally Posted by igliashon View Post
My guess is that chestnut starch is harder to get into solution than most grain starch; but I can't imagine why, presuming you get a comparably-fine grind, that a 15-20 minute boil wouldn't fully gelatinize them, after which point you could cool them to optimal saccharification temp, add the enzymes, and get full conversion inside 2 hours. But I'm also not a food scientist, so there could be a piece I'm missing.
Update: Over the holidays I saw fresh chestnuts on sale, so chopped, dried in a food dehydrator, and then ground them in my corona mill. I tried exactly this: boiling for 15 minutes, then cooling to saccarification temp and adding enzymes.

The answer to this question is a resounding no, it can't (shouldn't) be done that way. The boiling of the chestnut chips left a lot of starch particles in the solution that wouldn't convert. I finished the brew session anyways, and had a good primary fermentation, but I can see a good 6-12 inches of starch that has settled in my carboy. My yield off of this 5 gallon batch will be lucky to be 2.5 gallons.

I'm going to do another experiment though, testing brix and starch conversion on a long mash to see if that long mash is truly necessary (especially when adding 5# of sugar). I suspect that I can get a lot of flavor/color out of a much shorter mash, by only sacrificing a few gravity points.

Also, for those out there that think they can chop, dry, and grind their own chestnut chips for a fraction of the price of Chestnut Trails .... this is a huge PITA, and I now think the Chestnut Trails chips are an incredible bargain, compared to the hours of work it took me to get only a few pounds.

 
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Old 01-18-2013, 12:51 AM   #16
Psych
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Mar 2011
Kelowna, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frothdaddy View Post
Also, for those out there that think they can chop, dry, and grind their own chestnut chips for a fraction of the price of Chestnut Trails .... this is a huge PITA, and I now think the Chestnut Trails chips are an incredible bargain, compared to the hours of work it took me to get only a few pounds.
Hah, I recently had fire roasted chestnuts for the first time in my life this winter and holy moley was it a pain in the arse to get them out of their shells to eat. Couldn't imagine doing a few pounds of them!

 
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Old 10-29-2013, 07:33 PM   #17
max42
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Sep 2007
, MD
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Just brewed my 1st beer using Chestnuts a few weeks ago. I followed the Mashing instructions from Trails End as follows:

Heat 5 gallons of water to about 160-170 degrees and add bag with chips to pot. Add pectinase and amylase per manufacture’s directions. Chestnuts are really a fruit and the pectinase will create a much clearer end product by dissolving suspended pectins. Add water needed to fill brewing pot. Allow to soak 12-24 hours [24 is better] to obtain maximum enzyme action. During soak, raise and lower grain bag a couple times an hour when possible to get maximum sugar extraction. At the end of the soak you should have a brix of 4-5%.

I did mash for 24 hours at 166 degrees (that was were my stove could be adjusted to hold the temp) and ended up with a 5% Brix reading. I had an OG of 1.052. Primary fermentation was 2 weeks at 66 degrees. I took a gravity reading and it was 1.022! It fermented hard for about 1-2 days then the krausen fell. I repitched another pack of yeast, raised temp to 68 and tested again after 3 days, no change. I have since racked to a 2ndary and plan to dry hop before kegging. Makes no sense why the fermentation stoped as it wasn't tempeture or yeast related. My only thought is there are more unfermentables then planned.

I was researching mashing chestnuts to see what others may have found and discovered this thread. It was interesting that you are mashing at a lower temp.

I just went back to Trails End and noticed the Chestnut beer recipe has changed! Here are the latest instructions:

Heat 5 gallons of water to about 160-170 degrees and add bag with chips to pot. Remove from heat after about an hour and add pectinase and amylase per manufacture’s directions. [155 to 160 is temp that enzymes work the best] Chestnuts are really a fruit and the pectinase will create a much clearer end product by dissolving suspended pectins. Allow to soak 1-2 hours [2 is better] to obtain maximum enzyme action. Allow to soak for a few more hours. During soak, raise and lower grain bag a couple times an hour when possible, to get maximum sugar extraction. At the end of the soak you should have a brix of 4-5%.

Of note, no longer recommend 12-24 hour mash, mash temp is also lower (155-160) than before, and the pectinase and amylase are added after allowing it to cool below 160.

In looking at my results I see several possiblities for my, amalyse didn't achieve the correct conversion, mash was too warm and for too long.

Any other thoughts?



 
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