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Old 08-18-2012, 04:48 PM   #1
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Default Mash Temperature Experiment

Has anyone done a side by side experiment comparing just how much final gravity is effected by mashing in at 148F vs 158F (or other temps)?

I am thinking about doing a double brew day pretty soon with identical beers mashed in at two end-of-spectrum temperatures and pitching 1000ml yeast starter to each (from a 2000ml starter). All (well, all controllable) variables will be identical (amount of yeast, aeration, fermentation temp, etc) & FG results to be compared.

I'm just wondering if anyone has results that I can use to get a rough idea of what to expect?


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Old 08-18-2012, 04:51 PM   #2
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Has anyone done a side by side experiment comparing just how much final gravity is effected by mashing in at 148F vs 158F (or other temps)?

I am thinking about doing a double brew day pretty soon with identical beers mashed in at two end-of-spectrum temperatures and pitching 1000ml yeast starter to each (from a 2000ml starter). All (well, all controllable) variables will be identical (amount of yeast, aeration, fermentation temp, etc) & FG results to be compared.

I'm just wondering if anyone has results that I can use to get a rough idea of what to expect?
That's a great idea!

One thing to consider is the recipe. If you went with a fairly simple recipe, as just two-row I think the results would be more "real". What I mean is, a recipe with lots of crystal malts may not attenuate as well even at 148 degrees, while a recipe with lots of simple sugars would attenuate well even at 158 degrees. So I'd suggest something like 10 pounds of plain old US two-row and a .5 pound of crystal 40L in each 5 gallon batch, and using a medium attenuating yeast.


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Old 08-18-2012, 05:02 PM   #3
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Excellent! I found a little article after a second search that stated the following:

"See Starch Conversion. In the Limit of attenuation experiment it was found that, at a saccharification rest temperature above the temperature for maximum fermentability, an increase of the rest temperature by 1 C leads to a limit of attenuation drop of 4%" (Braukaiser, 2009).

If 1 C = 1.8 F, then for every 1.8 F over 148 F, attenuation supposedly drops 4%.

Using WY1056, attenuation of 73-77%, and comparing mash temps of 148F vs 158F should, by the information above, result in the 148F mash attenuating 22.2% more than the 158F mash. Does that sound about right?
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Old 08-18-2012, 05:14 PM   #4
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I've never seen such an experiment, but I would be awfully interested to. Please do it and update!
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Old 08-18-2012, 05:41 PM   #5
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Greg Doss of Wyeast just did it and reported the results at NHC in Seattle. He found that 153 produced the most fermentable wort, contrary to what we've all thought for years. He said he was going to do further experiments. Info here...http://www.homebrewersassociation.or...egg%20Doss.pdf
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Old 08-19-2012, 12:30 AM   #6
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Greg Doss of Wyeast just did it and reported the results at NHC in Seattle. He found that 153 produced the most fermentable wort, contrary to what we've all thought for years. He said he was going to do further experiments. Info here...http://www.homebrewersassociation.or...egg%20Doss.pdf
Those slides are awesome. Thanks a ton.
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Old 08-01-2014, 08:37 PM   #7
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This is a question I have been very interested in but have not tested it myself. Is there any more information on any testing anyone has done on this? I'd love to see if someone has tried this experiment (requires two completely separate beers brewed as close to the same as possible, so it is an even bigger pain to conduct than a split batch test!) and then tasted the resulting beers to see if there really is a difference in richness or fullness, etc.

I've been wondering if a higher terminal gravity would even result in a sweeter beer, as many say longer sugars aren't really sweet. I emailed Charlie Bamforth about this several years ago, and he had an interesting idea. He thought maybe that beers with more dextrins in them seemed to be fuller and richer because naturally occurring starch enzymes on our tongues might be working on the dextrins to break them into sweeter sugars as we drink those beers. I also thought it might be fun to buy some maltodextrin and put it into some beers and see if they seem to taste richer/sweeter, etc.

If there's no real difference, then it would make sense to make the highest yielding, highest fermentable wort possible for every beer.
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Old 08-02-2014, 01:29 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denny View Post
Greg Doss of Wyeast just did it and reported the results at NHC in Seattle. He found that 153 produced the most fermentable wort, contrary to what we've all thought for years. He said he was going to do further experiments. Info here...http://www.homebrewersassociation.or...egg%20Doss.pdf
What an awesome resource! Thanks Denny!
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Old 08-02-2014, 01:59 AM   #9
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I think I'll try mashing in at 153 for my barley wine tomorrow! I hope this data is correct!
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Old 08-02-2014, 07:14 AM   #10
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Mmmmm. After a slight issue today, I mashed my porter at 160 instead of 153. After I finished drowning my sorrows, I realized it will be a good comparison as I have brewed this before (it's one of my regular house beers).

Expecting a high fg, and plenty of residual sugars. Could be interesting.........


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