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Old 08-11-2012, 02:38 AM   #1
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I recently purchased a home brew kit. The directions, that came with, told me to do all the boiling, yadda, yadda, but when it came to fermentating. I fermented for 2 weeks. Check a.b.u. Wich was 0%. But then add sugar, when bottling. Then ferment for another week or two. I come out with low to no carbonation. And hardly any alcohol. Should I, just add the sugar last. When everything is said and done? So the yeast eats away at the sugar while fermenteing in the bucket?



 
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Old 08-11-2012, 02:44 AM   #2
punkerdru
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How did you check the Abu? If you use a hydrometer, you have to read the specific gravity (sg) and not the alcohol on it.

Did you bottle it after you added the second sugar? How does it taste?

When you use extract, as long as the yeast is still alive and you pitch at les than 100 or so you'll get the alcohol content on the instructions, there aren't really any other variables except the amount of water. If you post a list of the specific steps you took we can try to figure it out.



 
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Old 08-11-2012, 02:44 AM   #3
lumpher
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 25518 View Post
I recently purchased a home brew kit. The directions, that came with, told me to do all the boiling, yadda, yadda, but when it came to fermentating. I fermented for 2 weeks. Check a.b.u. Wich was 0%. But then add sugar, when bottling. Then ferment for another week or two. I come out with low to no carbonation. And hardly any alcohol. Should I, just add the sugar last. When everything is said and done? So the yeast eats away at the sugar while fermenteing in the bucket?
i think your measuring may be askew. there is no abu, and if you added yeast and it fermented at all, there would have been some alcohol. what did you do to measure original gravity and gravity at the time you later checked it?
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Old 08-14-2012, 02:11 PM   #4
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Where are you from? This will give us an idea of how best to help. Some places use different lingo and or equipment.

The "standard" method of fermenting is to let it do it's thing and then check gravity with a Hydrometer. You *should* have some gravity left over, meaning you did not lose every bit of sugar (like a wine can).

After you have the gravity down to it's expected level (1.012 or maybe less) you siphon into a bottling bucket with a sugar water solution and bottle. The yeast will eat the sugar and produce more alcohol AND CO2, but it will be contained within the bottle so it stays in solution until you open the bottle and get bubbles (CO2 becoming gaseous)

Some kits will have you add sugar along with the malt, but they are (usually) trying to save money by not giving enough malt. There are some beer styles that call for additional sugar as well, such as some Belgian beers. But generally you want the fermentables to come from grains. The 4 ounces of sugar is just to carb up the bottles.

 
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Old 08-26-2012, 12:01 AM   #5
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Flagstaff, Az be where I live. Think your right. I brewed another batch, last Saturday. Checked my levels and taste. The same as I first checked when I brewed it. this batch. I have fermenting at a lower temp as well. 64 63 instead of constant 73. But it's still the same. I'm lost. I'm doing something wrong. Just don't know what. I'm still novice. Trying to be brewmaster, lost.

 
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Old 08-26-2012, 12:40 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 25518 View Post
. I fermented for 2 weeks. Check a.b.u. Wich was 0%. But then add sugar, when bottling. Then ferment for another week or two. I come out with low to no carbonation. And hardly any alcohol. Should I, just add the sugar last. When everything is said and done? So the yeast eats away at the sugar while fermenteing in the bucket?
stop adding sugar then fermenting for 2 more weeks.
when its done add the priming sugar and bottle.

 
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Old 08-26-2012, 12:46 AM   #7
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Could it be your capping? Two weeks should be three. But are you making sure your bottling addition (sugars&water) are being mixed throughout the bottling bucket? Did you add anything to the boil that might have produced oil in the batch?

Lots of potenial reasons, need to know more about the steps you took.

 
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Old 08-26-2012, 01:38 AM   #8
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Not sure. Working on 3rd batch as we speak. It has been fermenting for a week now. A lot of bubbles in my airlock. Do I not have enough yeast? I add whatever testtube from whitelabs. 3, 4 ozs. To 5 gals. More yeast? I bet that be me screw up? Aaaarrrrggghhh.

 
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Old 08-26-2012, 05:25 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 25518 View Post
why is this so hilarious Pabloj13?
Because it was like a hilarious drunken pirate on caffeine was asking questions. Just relax. It's probably worth slowing down your pipeline a little bit if you have such basic questions. No reason to make gallon after gallon of iffy beer. We're going to need some more information to really help you.

What was the kit you bought and recipe?

How are you measuring specific gravity?

Why would "lots of bubbles in your airlock" make you think you didn't have enough yeast? One vial of White Labs is not really ideal for a moderate beer, but many many people have made beer that way. Ideally you'd like to make a starter in the future, but it's going to be ok?

Give me some answers, matey.
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Old 08-26-2012, 06:14 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 25518 View Post
why is this so hilarious Pabloj13?
I'm very new to brewing as well, and not trying to be an expert, but you definitely need to slow down a bit.

I'm confused about a few things with your process and your measurements.

1. How are you figuring your ABU is 0%? Measurements for alcohol content are taken by using a hydrometer to measure your OG and your FG to see how much of the sugar has been turned into alcohol by the yeast.

2. The sugar you have added after 2 weeks, You didn't completely explain how you went about this process. This is likely the priming sugar, it is used for priming the bottles to create carbonation. You would dissolve this sugar in water, add it to your bottling bucket with your fermented beer, and then bottle it up. The remaining yeast in the beer will turn this sugar into carbonation within 2-3 weeks.

If you added this sugar to the fermenter and allowed it to sit for another 2 weeks you will have successfully allowed your carbonation (or the vast majority of it) to release right out of your airlock, giving you a flat beer.

As long as you are following the directions of the kit for the boil you should have plenty of sugar for the yeast to eat. Follow the instructions with the yeast and you will have plenty to eat the sugar and turn it into alcohol. Follow the instructions for fermentation, take your readings with a hydrometer to confirm when it has completed, prime the beer and bottle correctly. Finally, you will have beer, that won't be too sweet and will have plenty of alcohol and carbonation.

It would be very helpful to know what size of batch you are making, and where you got the "Kit" or ingredients if it was a self made recipe.



 
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