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Old 08-09-2012, 10:35 PM   #1
mrdillon5
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Aug 2012
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I have been out of brewing for the last ten years. Recently just got back into it. Starting brewing back in the late 80's. Did everything from beers to wines to cider to mead. I point this out to show you that there are holes in my understanding.
I remember after doing a 5 gallon batch of fruit wine, it was common to add sugar and water back into 'the leftovers' and getting another one or two gallons of wine from the leftover fruits and yeast sediment. The second batch didn't have the color of the first but it tasted very similar.
I searched this site and read almost every post and I have not come across this in making fruit mead. I recently racked a primary fermentation of 5 gallons of mead that had 5 oranges and about a 100 raisins and yeast sediment in the leftovers. The fruit still looked to have some life. I took a one gallon jug, added 3 pounds of honey I had in house, added a little yeast nutrient, pectin enzyme and water and shook it good and then dumped it back into my 6 gallon pail of leftovers. I added in some nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves to spice it up. It was boiling away within 3 hours. It was done in 4 days and I just reracked into a one gallon jug. It did taste very good! Now wait till it settles out.
The next time I do this I will make sure I have 6 pounds of honey to stretch my leftover fruit into 2 gallon batches.
Anybody else do this with fruited meads?

 
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Old 08-11-2012, 02:26 AM   #2
avidhomebrewer
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Nope. All fruit meads I've made, I've added the fruit to the carboy after the majority of fermentation was over.

 
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Old 08-11-2012, 05:23 AM   #3
mrdillon5
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Aug 2012
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I do it the same way (usually). Add the fruit as the primary fermentation is slowing down. When you rack off the mead the fruit still has some life left in them. I was talking about reusing the leftovers. It is OK to mix fruit with primary fermentation in the beginning too. That is all I am saying, reuse what was left behind and get a 1 or 2 gallon batch out of the 5 or 6 gallons leftover fruit. I am just a cheap old [email protected] You will be surprised how good the second batch really is!

 
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Old 08-12-2012, 01:33 AM   #4
dkmitg
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Feb 2012
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If you do joes ancient orange mead it's added at the very start that's the one I got fermenting now and man that yeast is working

 
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Old 08-12-2012, 06:27 AM   #5
Zabuza
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Jul 2012
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I just read a thread about using leftover fruit + honey and water to make a smaller batch after the first is done. No, you are not crazy and yes, it is still practiced by some people. Wish I could remember e name of the thread...

 
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Old 08-12-2012, 03:09 PM   #6
mrdillon5
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Aug 2012
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Z - that was me. My post was off the subject, so I started a thread on this subject. I am new here and am a little clumsy

 
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Old 08-12-2012, 03:59 PM   #7
Zabuza
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Lol! Nice. Could've avoided that if my memory was a bit better.

To be honest, though, I don't see anything wrong with what you're talking about. I've definitely poured new wort on top of the yeast cake from my last batch (this is when brewing beer), and that's been totally fine. You can do that once or twice before the yeast needs to be gotten rid of. You should definitely expect less from the fruit, but I remember you saying in that last post that you were already expecting that, so no big deal there (you should still be able to get a significant amount of flavor, though - there should be a point where the flavor compounds leeched from the fruit/additives reaches equilibrium with the flavor compounds still in the fruit and thus, this leftover flavor in the fruit should be able to be extracted from subsequent batches). I would expect something that tasted a lot like a show mead but with hints of the leftovers in it as far as the end product goes.

 
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