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Old 08-08-2012, 10:05 PM   #1
AgentHubcap
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Dec 2011
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First of all, I tried to search, but didn't come up with much.

I know that I'm supposed to stick my brews in the fridge for a couple of days before opening them, but it doesn't always work out that way.

I had a bottle explode at some point in the last couple of days. I just walked into my garage now and found an exploded bottle. I also just had an infected batch, so I'm a bit paranoid now.

Anyway, I cracked one that was in the same case without chilling it to taste for an infection. It has been carbing for almost 3 weeks now, so I would expect it to be stable at this point. The beer gushed out of the bottle, but not super quick. It mostly just foamed out. It was pretty hot here recently (over 90F), and my garage is not air conditioned.

I can't really tell if this one is infected as it is pretty dark and complex. Tastes pretty green right now.

I've seen this happen before when I give a beer to a friend, and they just open it and try to drink it warm.

I guess my long-winded question is: do I need to chill my beer to get the CO2 into suspension, and will they always foam up when warm?



 
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Old 08-09-2012, 01:37 AM   #2
Lemon
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Jun 2011
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Three weeks at 90 & they are over carbonated. I hope two days in the fridge suspends the CO2, or you'll need to pour into pitchers & place in the fridge for a while.

Good Luck.



 
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Old 08-09-2012, 01:49 AM   #3
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Even normally carbed beer can gush sometimes if opened warm. Trying to open and drink a warm bottle of beer to troubleshoot it really isn't a good idea. You really should chill it first for at least a couple days. Even longer if you can stand to wait. If your beer is getting as warm as 90F in your garage you might want to try to get the bottles in the house where it's cooler. As you mentioned, the co2 does indeed need some time to absorb into the beer, so refrigerate one and try it. If they taste good, but they're still gushing then you should get them all chilled. If not, you might get more bottle bombs. Once chilled just pour them into a pitcher or very large mug and allow the head to drop, and then drink it up!
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Old 08-09-2012, 01:52 AM   #4
AgentHubcap
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemon View Post
Three weeks at 90 & they are over carbonated. I hope two days in the fridge suspends the CO2, or you'll need to pour into pitchers & place in the fridge for a while.

Good Luck.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought that the priming sugar would be eaten up completely to carbonate. Leaving them longer shouldn't create more CO2.

 
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Old 08-09-2012, 01:53 AM   #5
billl
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Cold liquid is capable of holding more gas in solution that warm liquid. It really does make a difference whether you chill it.

An no, not all beer will foam over. Anything young and on the edge over overcarbed will tend to though.

 
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Old 08-09-2012, 01:55 AM   #6
AgentHubcap
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stauffbier View Post
Even normally carbed beer can gush sometimes if opened warm. Trying to open and drink a warm bottle of beer to troubleshoot it really isn't a good idea. You really should chill it first for at least a couple days. Even longer if you can stand to wait. If your beer is getting as warm as 90F in your garage you might want to try to get the bottles in the house where it's cooler. As you mentioned, the co2 does indeed need some time to absorb into the beer, so refrigerate one and try it. If they taste good, but they're still gushing then you should get them all chilled. If not, you might get more bottle bombs. Once chilled just pour them into a pitcher or very large mug and allow the head to drop, and then drink it up!
Is this limited to homebrew or bottle conditioning? I used to drink my beer warm all the time when I bought it and never had a gusher. Or is it that it needs to get cold to suspend the CO2, but after that you can open warm?

 
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Old 08-09-2012, 02:14 AM   #7
Pilgarlic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AgentHubcap View Post
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought that the priming sugar would be eaten up completely to carbonate. Leaving them longer shouldn't create more CO2.
Right. The limiter is available sugar. Storing higher won't increase the carbonation.

 
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Old 08-09-2012, 02:24 AM   #8
jefflane510
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AgentHubcap View Post
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought that the priming sugar would be eaten up completely to carbonate. Leaving them longer shouldn't create more CO2.
You're right. The prime culprit here is overcarbonation, either from too much priming sugar or perhaps an infection that is eating up residual sugars (and releasing extra CO2). Properly carbonated bottles will not explode spontaneously at 90F

while it is true that very warm beers will sometimes gush, this doesn't appear to be the only cause of the problem here. One thing you can check is whether the current FG is the same as it was when you bottled. If something is eating your residual sugars beyond the limit that the yeast could tolerate, then you might be able to see the difference in gravity.

Another question is whether or not all the bottles are behaving similarly. It could be dirty bottles and not an entire batch that's infected or overcarbed.

 
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Old 08-09-2012, 02:39 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AgentHubcap View Post
Is this limited to homebrew or bottle conditioning? I used to drink my beer warm all the time when I bought it and never had a gusher. Or is it that it needs to get cold to suspend the CO2, but after that you can open warm?
Beer that has had more time to condition is probably less likely to gush. As mentioned in your case, it's more likely that you have an issue of "over carbonation", but since the bottles have only been conditioning for 3 weeks it could just need more time to absorb the co2. There is also a good chance that your beer might gush slightly if you're opening a bottle that is 90+ degrees. The higher the temp = the higher the pressure! This could add to the gushing effect if the beer still has a lot of co2 in the head space that hasn't absorbed in to the liquid...
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Old 08-09-2012, 03:27 AM   #10
AgentHubcap
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Only one of 100 or so exploded (10 gallon batch). Two are in the fridge now chilling. I'll crack one in a day or two to see if it gushes.



 
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