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Old 08-08-2012, 05:39 PM   #11
beerandloathinginaustin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djbradle View Post
He's looking for a historically French yeast not Belgian.
The point is still a good one though. It may be rather difficult to find anything exclusively French or Belgian.

I think this mission is difficult because it seems like every farmhouse was doing their own thing. That's why the style is so wide open.
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Old 08-08-2012, 06:59 PM   #12
djbradle
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That certainly was the case because according to the dude who is the fourth gen owner of Brasserie Duyck states there were around 2,000 as late as the the early 1900's all of them near the border with Belgium and all pretty much an actual farmhouse.

You could go there and swing your fermenter around and try to capture that wild one in the countryside

 
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Old 08-08-2012, 08:52 PM   #13
lowtones84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djbradle View Post
Maybe try harvesting some dregs from the likes of a bier de garde like Jenlain or tres monts? I just did a saison with acidulated malt and 3711 but it's still in the primary therefore I've nothing to add whether it would be slightly sour or not. It certainly has a more sour yeast smell than my usual brews during primary ferm.
I'm not sure which ones are or aren't, but a lot of bier de garde and French stuff is pasteurized. But to the point about using Belgian yeasts, I agree that yeast probably doesn't care about borders too much. Also keep in mind that being true to the original farmhouse style would be to use what is available around -you-, not France or Belgium. That said, I understand wanting to use French ingredients and processes.

 
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Old 08-08-2012, 09:06 PM   #14
djbradle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lowtones84

I'm not sure which ones are or aren't, but a lot of bier de garde and French stuff is pasteurized. But to the point about using Belgian yeasts, I agree that yeast probably doesn't care about borders too much. Also keep in mind that being true to the original farmhouse style would be to use what is available around -you-, not France or Belgium. That said, I understand wanting to use French ingredients and processes.
Indeed. Most likely as time progresses and the homebrewer is forced to use more local ingredients then we shall evolve greatly into unique and flavorful brews. . . . . Looking forward and not looking forward to this endgame.

 
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Old 08-09-2012, 08:54 PM   #15
Rarig
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In that case I think I'll just use my Von Wolfhausen recipe I found in Popo.
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Old 08-09-2012, 08:58 PM   #16
Rarig
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What I'll really do is open my eyes to a wild fermentation. Time to explore some more threads. I'm guessing I won't get as much of a vigorous yeast if it's local and wild, hence the fact traditional Saison being 3% abv.
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Old 08-09-2012, 10:40 PM   #17
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One of the hypothesis out there is that the Du Pont Saison strain, and most true Saison yeasts were derived from wine yeasts. I have to say, they are rather unique in their behavior....temperature tolerance, ester productions, etc.

I'd chime in my support for reading "farmhouse ales"

 
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Old 08-09-2012, 11:51 PM   #18
djbradle
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I'll have to check it out then. Sounds like a good read.

 
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Old 08-09-2012, 11:59 PM   #19
djbradle
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I'm willing to try soon in early fall when the temps drop to 60's during day to just put some wort with cheesecloth out in the back of my woods and see what wild yeast I can grab. Many have done this with success.

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