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Old 08-05-2012, 06:35 PM   #11
thughes
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robana: Just for the record, you are not advocating draining boiling wort (right at flameout) into a glass carboy or Better Bottle, are you? Perhaps I read you post (above) wrong? I just want to make sure that nobody tries that....I can guarantee that > 200F wort drained directly into a carboy or BB is not going to end well.
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Old 08-05-2012, 06:36 PM   #12
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This is a well-timed thread. I've been wanting to try no-chill as well. I was thinking about just using my plastic fermenter directly (http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/ite...3470&catid=752, type 2 HDPE). U.S. Plastics claims that they are ok to 190F. I would just pop the top to aerate and add the yeast after about 24 hours.

Anyone have any trouble with infection using a fermenter as the no-chill container? They probably won't seal as well as a winpack, but I feel like they would seal fairly well with the rubber o-ring and a solid bung in the air-lock hole...

 
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Old 08-05-2012, 06:40 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thughes View Post
robana: Just for the record, you are not advocating draining boiling wort (right at flameout) into a glass carboy or Better Bottle, are you? Perhaps I read you post (above) wrong? I just want to make sure that nobody tries that....I can guarantee that > 200F wort drained directly into a carboy or BB is not going to end well.
Actually I think he is. Better bottles are only rated to 140F, but glass (preheated) and the plastic buckets can handle near-boiling temperatures just fine (from what I've been reading.)

 
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Old 08-05-2012, 06:51 PM   #14
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I concur on the buckets (some people use them to boil wort in) but I will leave it to someone braver than myself to preheat a carboy and then drain near-boiling liquid into it. The mere thought of a glass carboy cracking/shattering and flooding the area with 200F liquid scares me.....a lot! Why even take the chance?
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Old 08-05-2012, 07:02 PM   #15
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I use the 6 gallon round Winpaks. I will whirlpool and let cool to 190F, use a ball valve in the kettle to drain to the Winpak, pitch the next day, ferment, cold crash, and rack to keg. Works great for me.

 
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Old 08-05-2012, 07:49 PM   #16
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I got straight to my fermenting bucket and then chill in my freezer over-night or slightly longer. Most of the time its down to pitching temps in around 6-8 hours.
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Old 08-05-2012, 10:14 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kzimmer0817 View Post
For those of you who no-chill, what are you using for containers?
I simply put the lid on my kettle and let chill over the following 10 - 20 hours, then pitch yeast in the kettle and ferment.....

Using a winpak or a sealed plastic vessel that you heat the interior, including the top is likely far more sanitary and can hold the wort for days or months, but I pitch heavily and healthy once down to temps without issues. I typically make beer that is kept cold after fermentation and consumed "fresh". This practice might not be a good idea if you are looking to cellar for months and months.

It's a game of numbers....

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Old 08-05-2012, 10:38 PM   #18
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The buckets will work for no-chill, but a glass carboy will shatter and a Better Bottle will melt.

I have back problems, so I use two- 2 1/2" gallon cubes. It makes it much easier to handle.

http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/ite...5627&catid=816

 
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Old 08-06-2012, 12:27 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigljd View Post
I'm assuming you keep the keg pressurized, right? Else you'd create a vacuum as it cools and it would suck in air and you'd no longer have a sterile environment in the keg.

I did no-chill in a corny once too - I kept it under pressure as it cooled off, and it worked well. It's definitely a good option for no-chill.
No problems without adding pressure. On another forum, someone has been using cronies for no chill for a couple years successfully. He only pressurized the first couple, been fine without.

 
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Old 08-07-2012, 10:57 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djt17 View Post
No problems without adding pressure. On another forum, someone has been using cronies for no chill for a couple years successfully. He only pressurized the first couple, been fine without.
Like robanna mentioned a few posts back, I think people are talking about 2 different things when it comes to no-chill or 'slow chill'.
How long are you waiting to pitch yeast? If it's the next day not pressurizing should be fine (you are probably sucking in bad bugs but pitching your yeast before they have time to take hold). If you are holding onto the wort for a week or more like I do quite often, I can't believe you'd be fine by not pressurizing. You'll create a vacuum which will pull in unclean air and after a week you'd be on the way to brewing a wild yeast brew.

 
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