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Old 08-03-2012, 09:11 PM   #1
ChuckD123
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Default What are your thoughts on using multiple yeast strains in a single batch of beer?

Seems like you could create some interesting flavors in your beer. Anyone ever do this?
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Old 08-03-2012, 09:16 PM   #2
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Nevermind, I found a thread that seems to fully address the issue.
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Old 08-03-2012, 09:21 PM   #3
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I wouldn't recommend simultaneous additions, some strains don't get along well with others (read up on competitive factors in yeast). There are two options that I have read about in use:

1) Let the first yeast do it's job until just about complete, then add the second yeast for it's desired effects (usually flavor or higher alcohol tolerance)

2) Ferment the batches separately then blend the finished beer. This can create 3 options; blended beer plus each of the batches separately, or even blended in varying percentages....bench trials are the easiest way to choose your blending percentage.

Just don't add wine yeast to fermenting beer until the beer yeast is COMPLETELY finished. Wine yeast will kill beer yeast and the wine yeast cannot ferment maltose or maltotriose (glucose chains).
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Old 08-04-2012, 06:17 PM   #4
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I've successfully added multiple yeasts at once. I have pitched brett. and saison yeasts, different saison yeasts in different proportions and have really loved the flavors I get. I typically will also repitch with the same yeasts and have made house blends and have had a lot of success that way too.

I don't believe that there are any killer yeast strains in beer (unlike wine).
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Old 08-04-2012, 08:12 PM   #5
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I did a Belgian using 1214 and 3787. Came out great, and you could taste both yeasts. The3787 was a little more pronounced, because 1214 can take a little longer to start. If I did it again I would give the 1214 a few hours head start.
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