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Old 07-30-2012, 03:32 PM   #11
Jubilee
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Sep 2010
Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piratwolf View Post
Above all, don't be afraid of it. After switching I wondered what the big deal is
+1. Just do it!

 
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Old 07-30-2012, 03:52 PM   #12
ahaley
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Jan 2012
Tracy, Ca
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Ok you guys are twisting my arm!
So far my equipment list is the following
5 gal pot
Grain bag for speciality grains
Boil proof spoon
And the miscellaneous ones, hydrometer, thief, racking tubes ect.

To go to AG I need a bigger pot, i also heard that turkey friers work wonder for temp control, is this true? the voile bag, lauter tun & mash tun(?) do I need a CFC or something of the sort to chill rapidly?
Because I let it do it's thing in the bath tub with water and that takes for ever.. I did recently get a carboy though I think that was an upgrade
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Old 07-30-2012, 03:54 PM   #13
Phyrst
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Sep 2011
Katy, TX
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It's a learning curve no matter when you start. The sooner you start, the sooner you get up to speed.

I switched to AG back in the spring and I love it. I feel like I have a lot more control over my beer now and it forces you to do your research on ingredients before you just dump it in there. I put my first recipe together on an IPA and it came out great. It's an amazing feeling to say you made a beer nobody else has ever made and it tastes pretty damn good.

 
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Old 07-30-2012, 04:02 PM   #14
ahaley
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Jan 2012
Tracy, Ca
Posts: 645
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phyrst
It's a learning curve no matter when you start. The sooner you start, the sooner you get up to speed.

I switched to AG back in the spring and I love it. I feel like I have a lot more control over my beer now and it forces you to do your research on ingredients before you just dump it in there. I put my first recipe together on an IPA and it came out great. It's an amazing feeling to say you made a beer nobody else has ever made and it tastes pretty damn good.
Ya thats what I've wanted to do when I learned brewing beer was legal!
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Old 07-30-2012, 04:03 PM   #15
Phyrst
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Sep 2011
Katy, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ahaley View Post
Ok you guys are twisting my arm!
So far my equipment list is the following
5 gal pot
Grain bag for speciality grains
Boil proof spoon
And the miscellaneous ones, hydrometer, thief, racking tubes ect.

To go to AG I need a bigger pot, i also heard that turkey friers work wonder for temp control, is this true? the voile bag, lauter tun & mash tun(?) do I need a CFC or something of the sort to chill rapidly?
Because I let it do it's thing in the bath tub with water and that takes for ever.. I did recently get a carboy though I think that was an upgrade
Get a bigger pot and a propane burner so you can do full volume boils. Bayou Classic makes a good turkey fryer with an 11 gallon pot. That's what I use.

Then drop 75 bucks and make a mash tun out of a 10 gallon cooler. There are tutorials all over the internet on how to do it. Or you could start out doing BIAB.

Chilling rapidly helps. Immersion chiller is the cheapest way to go there. If your ground water is pretty cold it should do the trick. I live in TX, so my ground water is 85 F in the summer. I have a small submercible pond pump I use to circulate ice water from a cooler through the chiller.

The greatest thing about this hobby is there is no end to how far you can take it. I've always got my mind set on something I want, and I tell myself once I get it I'll be satisfied and won't need anymore gear. But then I get it, and I immediately start thinking about my next purchase. You're always buying things to speed up your brew day, or improve your beer, increase your capacity, or just because it's damn cool.

Happy brewing!

 
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Old 07-30-2012, 04:07 PM   #16
kh54s10
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Aug 2011
Tiverton, Rhode Island
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Keep reading, Look at batch sparging, fly sparging as well as BIAB. There are equipment requirement differences.

YouTube has some really good videos so you can see the processes.

All grain does take longer and there are more things that you have to watch. But it is not really difficult.

Personally I have done extract, partial mash, batch sparging and BIAB.

I am one that dislikes BIAB because, for a five gallon batch, you get a heavy hot sticky mess. I will be doing more though when the weather gets cold again and I don't want to brew outside. It is also great for smaller test batches.

Don't fear AG!
Also don't feel you have to go AG. Some brewers are satisfied never going all grain.

 
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Old 07-30-2012, 04:16 PM   #17
ahaley
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Jan 2012
Tracy, Ca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kh54s10
Keep reading, Look at batch sparging, fly sparging as well as BIAB. There are equipment requirement differences.

YouTube has some really good videos so you can see the processes.

All grain does take longer and there are more things that you have to watch. But it is not really difficult.

Personally I have done extract, partial mash, batch sparging and BIAB.

I am one that dislikes BIAB because, for a five gallon batch, you get a heavy hot sticky mess. I will be doing more though when the weather gets cold again and I don't want to brew outside. It is also great for smaller test batches.

Don't fear AG!
Also don't feel you have to go AG. Some brewers are satisfied never going all grain.
I've watched a few videos of brew day on YouTube and I understand some of it but I just don't understand a few things, like if I do BIAB, do I need to sparge or fly sparge, do I need to convert an ice chest to a lauter tun, do I still need to mash if I do BIAB? I've read how to brew, the AG section like 4 times and I don't know if all the technicalities psych me out or if my mind isnt concentrating on what I'm reading...
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Old 07-30-2012, 05:07 PM   #18
solbes
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Jul 2011
Ramsey & Akeley, Mn
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If you do brew in a bag, there is usually no sparge done as the water to grist ratio is more dilute (higher efficiency). I will sometimes do a drip sparge or dunk sparge. I always hang my turkey frier basket and grains (after 60 minute mash) from a rope and pulley. Squeeze the bag with a saucepan lid to get most of the wort to drop into the boil kettle below. For sparging you can either dunk sparge (best effieciency) where you dip the whole bag into a second vessel at 170F. Let it sit for 5-10 minutes and combine wort. Or you can drip sparge where you sprinkle the 170F sparge water over the suspended grain bag. Both are pretty easy.

Best thing about BIAB is less equipment to buy and less equipment to clean on brew day. No other real disadvantages except that you need a large boil kettle if you have a large grain bill (over 13-15 lbs or so). You do get a little more trub in your fermenter with BIAB, but the voile bags help alot.

Mash and lauter tun would be if you went the more traditional all grain route.
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Old 07-30-2012, 05:17 PM   #19
ahaley
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Jan 2012
Tracy, Ca
Posts: 645
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solbes
If you do brew in a bag, there is usually no sparge done as the water to grist ratio is more dilute (higher efficiency). I will sometimes do a drip sparge or dunk sparge. I always hang my turkey frier basket and grains (after 60 minute mash) from a rope and pulley. Squeeze the bag with a saucepan lid to get most of the wort to drop into the boil kettle below. For sparging you can either dunk sparge (best effieciency) where you dip the whole bag into a second vessel at 170F. Let it sit for 5-10 minutes and combine wort. Or you can drip sparge where you sprinkle the 170F sparge water over the suspended grain bag. Both are pretty easy.

Best thing about BIAB is less equipment to buy and less equipment to clean on brew day. No other real disadvantages except that you need a large boil kettle if you have a large grain bill (over 13-15 lbs or so). You do get a little more trub in your fermenter with BIAB, but the voile bags help alot.

Mash and lauter tun would be if you went the more traditional all grain route.
How do you do the " traditional" route? Pour the grains in a mash tun and pour hot water on them?
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Old 07-30-2012, 05:21 PM   #20
pentachris
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Apr 2012
Montgomery, AL
Posts: 146
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My next batch will be my first AG attempt. Watching this video convinced me that it's nothing to really be afraid of:


 
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