Mash and Sparge Temp - Home Brew Forums

Register Now!
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Mash and Sparge Temp

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-28-2012, 06:08 PM   #1
elgee
Recipes 
 
Apr 2012
Stamford, CT
Posts: 176
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts



How do I determine what the right mash and sparge temp would be for an all grain Belgian would be. This will be similar to a Blue Moon style? I typically just go with 155 for my AG mash temps, but wondering if there is a calculator or something that helps determine where the temp should be?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2012, 06:26 PM   #2
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jun 2006
UP of Michigan, Winter Texan
Posts: 69,406
Liked 7836 Times on 5490 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by elgee View Post
How do I determine what the right mash and sparge temp would be for an all grain Belgian would be. This will be similar to a Blue Moon style? I typically just go with 155 for my AG mash temps, but wondering if there is a calculator or something that helps determine where the temp should be?
A good rule of thumb is that lower mash temperatures favor a thinner, drier, beer that finishes with a lower FG while a warmer mash temp favors a fuller bodied beer that finishes with a higher FG.

A lower mash temp would be 147-150, while a higher mash temp would be 155-158. In the middle would be a medium bodied beer with an average FG.

Of course grainbill plays a huge part, as does the yeast strain.

But say you had a grainbill of 10 pounds base malt, and 1 pound of crystal. Using the same yeast strain, and everything else being the same, you could expect some differences.

For example, in my system, here's what I'd expect to happen.

At a mash temp of 147, I'd expect a thin bodied beer with a crisp finish and it to finish at 1.007-1.009.

At a mash temp of 150-152, I'd expect a medium bodied beer with a FG of 1.010-1.014.

At a mash temp of 155-158, I'd expect a fuller bodied beer with a FG of 1.016-1.020.

In other words, you can use the mash temperature to manipulate the body and amount of residual sugars in the mash. That means that you can make a Belgian finish light and crisp at under 1.010, by mashing under 150 degrees. That's pretty typical, and that's what I'd do.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2012, 06:32 PM   #3
elgee
Recipes 
 
Apr 2012
Stamford, CT
Posts: 176
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts


Awesome, thanks for the information, very helpful.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2012, 08:52 PM   #4
MrKentGoldings
Recipes 
 
Jul 2012
Posts: 13
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


I normally stick to around 153F and that tends to give a nice medium bodied brew. Any higher and it seems to sweet

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2012, 08:57 PM   #5
bobbrews
Recipes 
 
Jan 2011
Sierra, Nevada
Posts: 4,034
Liked 439 Times on 350 Posts


Yooper gave you awesome info.

For a pale hoppy beer, things start to get sticky sweet if the FG is above 1.020

They're average sweetness at about 1.015 FG

They're quite dry at 1.010 FG (this is my preference give or take a few points)

Tip: If you're brewing partial mash, I like to use 5-7% wheat for added body & head retention, and mash very low -- 145-ish. The extract was probably mashed 8-10 F hotter than this by the maltster, which will make up for any lacking body.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2012, 01:19 AM   #6
callback79
Recipes 
 
Jun 2012
Quebec, Qc
Posts: 99
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
A good rule of thumb is that lower mash temperatures favor a thinner, drier, beer that finishes with a lower FG while a warmer mash temp favors a fuller bodied beer that finishes with a higher FG.

A lower mash temp would be 147-150, while a higher mash temp would be 155-158. In the middle would be a medium bodied beer with an average FG.

Of course grainbill plays a huge part, as does the yeast strain.

But say you had a grainbill of 10 pounds base malt, and 1 pound of crystal. Using the same yeast strain, and everything else being the same, you could expect some differences.

For example, in my system, here's what I'd expect to happen.

At a mash temp of 147, I'd expect a thin bodied beer with a crisp finish and it to finish at 1.007-1.009.

At a mash temp of 150-152, I'd expect a medium bodied beer with a FG of 1.010-1.014.

At a mash temp of 155-158, I'd expect a fuller bodied beer with a FG of 1.016-1.020.

In other words, you can use the mash temperature to manipulate the body and amount of residual sugars in the mash. That means that you can make a Belgian finish light and crisp at under 1.010, by mashing under 150 degrees. That's pretty typical, and that's what I'd do.
Good to know ! That means an accurate thermometer is very important. Good post Yooper.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Partial Mash Sparge Temp frozt All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 03-15-2012 03:01 PM
Mash Out, Sparge Water temp control chezhed All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 4 06-14-2011 02:38 PM
can beersmith calc mash and sparge temp and volume ekjohns All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 04-11-2010 10:12 PM
Low mash temp = low sparge temp? jackson_d All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 7 08-03-2009 01:45 AM
Mash Out Temp/Sparge Temp dblee50 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 2 09-29-2006 09:57 PM


Forum Jump