Should I bother trying to age a porter? - Home Brew Forums

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Old 07-24-2012, 05:44 AM   #1
Han_Solo
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Apr 2012
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I have read a few things about aging beer and they seem to go either one way or the other. I brewed some porter recently and was wondering if I should set a few aside for awhile. Anyone here ever age their beer after they brew it?

 
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Old 07-24-2012, 06:20 AM   #2
Diaperload
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Some of my beers have tasted WAY better after aging for a few months while others haven't aged so well.

The 2 beers that I have made that have aged the best are a Pumpkin Ale and a porter. Both were ok at first but fantastic after some aging.

I can recall 2 of my beers that didn't age very well. One was a red rye and the other a milk cream stout which developed a metallic taste after 6 months.

Sorry for the ambiguous answer.
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Old 07-24-2012, 07:13 AM   #3
cfonnes
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I have yet to brew a beer where the last one out of the keg was the best one. Makes me think that I should age them all longer.

 
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Old 07-24-2012, 07:25 AM   #4
Zen_Brew
 
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It depends on how long you are talking about aging. A porter should do well with a bit of age on it. The chocolate malts will help it resist oxidation, and the strong raosty flavors will meld together better over time. No need to let it go for more than a couple three months though I would think. Maybe six on the outside.

Is there a flavor component in your recent porter you are unhappy with?
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Old 07-24-2012, 09:48 AM   #5
asidrane
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My first brew was a robust honey porter and I had the last bottle about 13 months after brew day. It was fantastic!

 
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Old 07-24-2012, 12:44 PM   #6
progmac
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unlike IPAs, porters age very well. i like at least 8 weeks from brew day on average gravity porters, stouts, and browns. you wouldn't gain much if anything by long-term aging (9+ months) with standard gravity brews, that is reserved more for the imperials, etc

 
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Old 07-24-2012, 01:04 PM   #7
ludomonster
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I hide a bottle so I can taste it long after I had finished its brethren. My latest surprise was a 6-month old dunkelweizen that went clear.

 
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Old 07-24-2012, 01:17 PM   #8
duckredbeard
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One of my short term goals is to get a porter set aside for winter. I already have the recipe, but it is third in line to be brewed. It is my experience that complex ales such as porter greatly improve with cold conditioning.

 
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Old 07-24-2012, 01:18 PM   #9
broadbill
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
unlike IPAs, porters age very well. i like at least 8 weeks from brew day on average gravity porters, stouts, and browns. you wouldn't gain much if anything by long-term aging (9+ months) with standard gravity brews, that is reserved more for the imperials, etc

+1 to this. Talking about aging is useless unless you are actually talking a specific time-point and a beer in question. Aging a porter for 6 months is not advised, but you want to go at least 6 months on a barleywine.

 
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Old 07-24-2012, 01:26 PM   #10
solbes
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I have only brewed one porter, but I would say it peaked at around 2 months in the bottle. It really was pretty good right after bottle carbing though. The late cascade addition is starting to fade now. Its sitting at 4 months right now and I'm down to maybe 10 bottles left.
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