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Old 07-23-2012, 10:23 PM   #11
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Yeah, I was wondering if the yeast really had anything left to do after the D-rest. Are they supposed to still clean up some things, or just settle out during the lagering period.


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Old 07-25-2012, 06:30 PM   #12
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From reading How to Brew, it seems that the yeast are still cleaning up and getting through the last few gravity points during lagering. But my understanding from this thread so far, and other things I've been reading, is that fermentation should be all but done by the time the lagering period begins, and the bulk of what is happening during that period is that proteins, polyphenols, and yeast are dropping out of suspension and the beer is being cleaned up that way.

So I guess my answer is I don't know but I suspect it is some combination of the two and I just went straight to fridge at ~34 trusting the yeast to do their job and thinking that any yeast that are left to clean up at that temp will still be there and still able to work whether it takes them 7 days or 17 hours to cool off that much.


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Old 07-25-2012, 10:34 PM   #13
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You could name it after Aaron Rodgers, since he'll be tearing you guys up this year
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Old 07-29-2012, 02:38 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeafSmith View Post
I have a question - after the diacetyl rest, is there any point in ramping the temperature slowly down to lagering temperature, or can it be taken down quickly?
The slow ramp-down was done traditionally to allow the yeast to clean up the diacytl as the beer was cooling down to lager temps. If you do a proper d-rest at elevated temps, then there's no reason to slow-cool. Just crash hard and lager for as long as you need. And I highly doubt that the lager yeast are doing ANYTHING at 32-33F. They are just going to sleep and drifting down to the bottom of the vessel.
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Old 07-29-2012, 03:35 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghpeel View Post
The slow ramp-down was done traditionally to allow the yeast to clean up the diacytl as the beer was cooling down to lager temps. If you do a proper d-rest at elevated temps, then there's no reason to slow-cool. Just crash hard and lager for as long as you need. And I highly doubt that the lager yeast are doing ANYTHING at 32-33F. They are just going to sleep and drifting down to the bottom of the vessel.
Thanks - that's pretty much what I thought, but wanted to be sure before I do another lager.
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Old 07-30-2012, 08:31 AM   #16
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It really depends if the beer is finished with fermentation, or if you need to keep the yeast around to process diacetyl etc. Personally I like to use a diacetyl rest, after which I can crash cool the beer to lagering temps and let it sit for a while. But if you need the yeast to work, a slow cooling to lager temp. is needed.


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