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Old 07-16-2012, 03:02 PM   #1
sidepart
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Just a curiosity. I'm going to be making a pretty hefty Russian Imperial Stout that's going to sit around in a secondary for awhile. I wanted to add some extra yeast to the bottling bucket to be certain I get carbonation.

I only need a couple of grams. Should I really hike out to the brewshop for that, or could I just pitch in a gram or two of bread yeast instead? It's such a small amount, I can't think it'd make much of a flavor difference if any. Only thing I'd be concerned about is the temperature at which bread yeast ferments.

 
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Old 07-16-2012, 03:55 PM   #2
RuffRider
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I'm not a big bottler. I can count the number of batches on two hands I bottled before I moved to kegging and forced carbonation so I'm no expert.

However, the thought of putting bread yeast within shouting distance of my beer sets off all sorts of alarms. I've never heard of that being a good idea.

What I have always been told, however, is that there will still be enough yeast suspended in your beer to allow for carbonation. Bigger beers will take longer to carb up but you plan on aging it for a while anyway. So, don't add yeast...especially bread yeast. Prime it, bottle it, and age. That's my vote!

Cheers!

 
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Old 07-16-2012, 04:00 PM   #3
Draken
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I would use either the original yeast or if the ABV is up near 10% a dry champagne yeast. Bread yeast don't tolerate alcohol well so you might kill them just dumping them in.

 
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Old 07-16-2012, 04:18 PM   #4
sweed
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sidepart View Post
Just a curiosity. I'm going to be making a pretty hefty Russian Imperial Stout that's going to sit around in a secondary for awhile. I wanted to add some extra yeast to the bottling bucket to be certain I get carbonation.

I only need a couple of grams. Should I really hike out to the brewshop for that, or could I just pitch in a gram or two of bread yeast instead? It's such a small amount, I can't think it'd make much of a flavor difference if any. Only thing I'd be concerned about is the temperature at which bread yeast ferments.
My RIS is over 11% and I am just going to prime it with 5 oz dex. Its my first RIS, and 2nd homebrew, and I expect it to take a while to carbonate. IF it doesn't do well, my next batch I'll add in some yeast. I'm going to try and see how this goes for now.

 
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Old 07-16-2012, 04:34 PM   #5
sidepart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RuffRider View Post
What I have always been told, however, is that there will still be enough yeast suspended in your beer to allow for carbonation.
There should be and I haven't had any issues yet but I've never brewed such a high gravity ale before. I'd be super disappointed to crack it open in a year and find no carb. You're right, probably won't need it, but there really isn't any harm in adding a little just to be sure.

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Originally Posted by Draken View Post
I would use either the original yeast or if the ABV is up near 10% a dry champagne yeast. Bread yeast don't tolerate alcohol well so you might kill them just dumping them in.
Figured as much. I'll probably have some washed yeast sitting around in that distant future. A few ml's should take care of it anyway.

 
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Old 07-16-2012, 05:54 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Draken View Post
I would use either the original yeast or if the ABV is up near 10% a dry champagne yeast. Bread yeast don't tolerate alcohol well so you might kill them just dumping them in.
+1 The Champagne yeast produces very little additional flavor and can be a good way to ensure natural carbonation if you are worried about it. It should carb over time if you let it age but who wants to take the chance on something youve aged for so long

Hope this helps!
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Old 07-16-2012, 06:08 PM   #7
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For best results, you may want to rehydrate some ec-1118 and then start feeding it with the same beer + priming sugar concentration it will be eating in the bottle, a little at a time, and make a sort of starter. Give them a kick-start on the alcohol tolerance.

 
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Old 07-16-2012, 06:28 PM   #8
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If its been in secondary for less than 3 months I wouldn't pitch any fresh yeast, certainly not bread yeast. You spent a lot of time and money to get it this far; don't go all willy nilly now. You could add yeast from just about any beer strain that has a higher alcohol tolerance. If you used a yeast in batch #3 that could handle higher alcohol, just grab a little yeast from the trub and pitch into your RIS bottling bucket. Or sprinkle in some new champagne yeast if you really want to be sure.
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Old 07-16-2012, 08:15 PM   #9
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I just bottled a RIS with an AbV just a smidge over 12% if you use the "alternative" formula using Wyeast 3787. It sat in secondary for nearly a month. A week later it's developing a little carbination, but it's real slow. Also, to help you find out if something is carbing or not, bottle just one plastic bottle (PET) so that you can periodically squeeze it to check carb levels.
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