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Old 07-14-2012, 05:11 AM   #1
malt20
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I know somebody has to know what im talking about. what is the homebrew taste. It's not any type of infection. Ive tasted other old homebrewers beer that doesnt seem to have it and they wont really let their secret out. Kegging seems to have a little less of the homebrew taste. water is fine. I do all grain sparge batching (no extract) and have a freezer i ferment in so the temp isnt all over the place. I am extremely clean and sanitary. Can anybody explain or expand on the subject..........

 
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Old 07-14-2012, 05:19 AM   #2
Jwood
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do you taste this in many different homebrews, or only your own homebrew? It could just be a process/ingredient related issue with your setup.

 
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Old 07-14-2012, 05:37 AM   #3
malt20
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i taste it in all of them including my buddies homebrew and others. some people know what im talking about. i dont know if i just have a really sensitive pallet or what. if i make a clone of something and then try the commercial beer right after i can really tell. like i said its not bad, just tastes like homebrew beer. i can run my entire process by if that would help.

 
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Old 07-14-2012, 05:43 AM   #4
dallasdb
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By Homebrew taste do you mean more "full" bodied or a little heavier?

Since I started brewing all commercial beers taste more watered down than mine. I enjoy the homebrew more than commercial brews now because I lile tje more full bodied taste.

 
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Old 07-14-2012, 05:47 AM   #5
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There's no secret. It's a matter of narrowing down process steps to make everything ever-more perfect.

A few points)

1: Most breweries have setups that rapidly chill the wort from boil to fermenter. This gives you a good cold break and helps coagulate some of the material which may affect flavor when you package.
2: Commercial breweries oxygenate wort.
3: Commercial breweries pitch enough yeast.
4: Commercial breweries control fermentation temps.
5: Commercial breweries have methods to remove yeast, trub, sediment, and often filter the product before it goes to packaging.

That's a simple list, and obviously there's a lot more that goes into it. Ingredient freshness, the quality control processes that [should] come with a product that you're offering for sale, etc.

But really, brewing is like baking. It's all about process first, second and third. Hone your process. Constantly look for places where you can improve the process, and you'll see that "homebrew taste" magically go away.

 
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Old 07-14-2012, 01:10 PM   #6
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My guess is you're tasting yeast.

I make 10g batches and keg. I have filtered 5g and not filtered the other 5g and the taste difference was pretty big. I discovered that I really don't like the taste of yeast.

 
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Old 07-14-2012, 01:23 PM   #7
dallasdb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gameface
My guess is you're tasting yeast.

I make 10g batches and keg. I have filtered 5g and not filtered the other 5g and the taste difference was pretty big. I discovered that I really don't like the taste of yeast.
Did you calculate the amount of yeast needed before pitching?
I never do but I wonder if the proper amount would help the taste.

 
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Old 07-14-2012, 01:36 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dallasdb View Post
Did you calculate the amount of yeast needed before pitching?
I never do but I wonder if the proper amount would help the taste.
Yeah, I use BeerSmith to determine how many yeast I need. I have a 5L flask and a stir plate and make pretty large starters. I figure I overshoot the recommended number of yeast most of the time, as I typically make beers in the 1.040 - 1.060 range.

I think pitching plenty of yeast, temp control and filtering out the yeast (as well as producing crystal clear beer) cumulatively has made all the difference in my beer.

 
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Old 07-14-2012, 01:40 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gameface View Post
My guess is you're tasting yeast.

I make 10g batches and keg. I have filtered 5g and not filtered the other 5g and the taste difference was pretty big. I discovered that I really don't like the taste of yeast.
I'll go with this. I filter some beers and the difference in taste (and appearance!) is very noticeable.
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Old 07-14-2012, 02:05 PM   #10
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If it's not a yeasty taste you're experiencing, then you're falling short in some part of your process, because my homebrew just tastes like fresh beer to me. Afterall we do nearly the same process as the big boys do, except on a smaller scale.

I can understand sometimes extract brewers say that their beer's have a "homebrewed" taste which they also call "twang" which may or may not exist, which may be an inherent maillard reaction from already having had the grain boiled to make extract, or metallic from the can if it's liquid , or even a freshness issue.

But except for maybe an excess of yeast (but if you drink commercial bottle conditioned beers, you're getting yeast as well and should be used to it.)

The other question is, what kind of commercial beers do you drink? If your pallet was raised on American Light Lagers/BMC and you're brewing ales then the difference could simple be that Lagers have a cleaner flavor profile, while ales tend to have more flavor complexity, more hops, more yeast character, more complexity in grains that provide a depth of flavor.

The other thing I've noticed that folks who make this complaint are often rushing through the process, and simple not letting the beer condition, be it in the fermenter, or in the bottle or keg long enough.....
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