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Old 07-12-2012, 10:49 PM   #1
Bigloveystyle
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Apr 2011
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How do I make my brew smoother? Every batch seems to have some bite. I use Palmer's How to Brew carbonation table to ensure the accurate amount of priming sugar is added. Any secret tips to make my brew a little smoother??? I appreciate any help



 
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Old 07-12-2012, 11:04 PM   #2
KISS Brew
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Jan 2011
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What do you mean by bite? If you place it into one of the categories found here: http://www.howtobrew.com/section4/chapter21-2.html/ we might be able to help.


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Old 07-12-2012, 11:11 PM   #3
brtisbuck
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Dec 2011
cleveland, Ohio
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The is not only the question of "what do you mean by bite", but also what types of beer have you brewed that have said bite?
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Old 07-12-2012, 11:15 PM   #4
Greenbasterd
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Feb 2012
Van, BC
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johnny? is that you johnny?

 
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Old 07-12-2012, 11:48 PM   #5
Bigloveystyle
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Apr 2011
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It feels like its over carbonated when it hits your tongue but the beers do not have excessive head. It might be a yeast problem...I have brewed IPA's, Porters, Stouts, RyePA's, Belgians and Raspberry Ales and they all seem to have that same mouthfeel/flavor. I have always leaned towards a yeast issue. I have used both Wyeast and Safale

 
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Old 07-13-2012, 12:12 AM   #6
KISS Brew
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Which Wyeast? Which Safale? I've had great experiences with both of their products.

How are you adding the priming sugar to your beer?
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Fermenting / Conditioning:
Beyond the Pale Ale, Cut and Dry Stout

Bottled:
Hoptoberfest IPA, Oktoberfest Ale, Blonde Ale, Scottish Ale, Oatmeal Stout, Edwort's Apfelwein, Janet's Brown Ale, Irish Red Ale, Strawberry Wheat, ESB, Belgian Pale Ale

KISS Brew Homebrewing Blog

Most recent post: Beyond the Pale Ale Recipe

 
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Old 07-13-2012, 01:51 AM   #7
RM-MN
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Nov 2010
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My smoothest ale started its life in a bucket in a 62 degree ambient temperature and it took about 4 days for the ferment to settle down. At the end of a week I moved it to a warmer location (72 ambient) and left it for another 3 1/2 weeks before bottling. After a week in the bottle this was getting smooth. Now at 6 months it goes down real easy.

The lesson I'm trying to give is:
1. Cooler fermentation is better as the yeast work slower and don't create the compounds that give your beer the bite.
2. Patience. That big yeast cake does more than just take up space in your fermenter.
3. More patience. The chemical transformations that make beer good don't stop with bottling.

My beer was a bit more extreme than most, a dark stout with lots of black malt which takes more time to mature but even lighters beers don't improve by handling them quicker.

 
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Old 07-13-2012, 02:01 AM   #8
klnosaj
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My guess would be water. If your water is hard/minerally it will accentuate the bitterness and bite of the hops, sometimes to the point of masking everything else. Check out the Brew Science section with special attention to AJDelange's brewing water chemistry primer (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/bre...primer-198460/ ).

 
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Old 07-13-2012, 09:47 PM   #9
Bigloveystyle
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Apr 2011
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I usually use 1056 or US-05. We have a well so I'm leaning more towards the water issue. I have not tested the ph of the water or anything. I might try using bottled water to see if I get a different result. I'm brewing tomorrow.

 
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Old 07-17-2012, 07:40 PM   #10
cosmo
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Nov 2010
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I also have a well and have struggled with harsh aftertaste for a long time (both extract and all grain). Although I am in a different part of the country, moderate to high carbonates seem fairly common in many places, so it is possibly an issue for you as well. Two things that made the biggest difference for me were 1) filtering all my water with a reverse osmosis filter to remove almost all minerals. For all grain I add back Ca via calcium chloride and gypsum. And 2) using hop sacks with pellet hops to reduce the amount of hop material getting into the fermenter. I suspect the water was the biggest improvement even though my carbonates were not super high (total alkalinity 57 ppm CaCO3). These two things helped both my ligheter beers (Kolsh, APA, blonde) and even dark beers (stouts and porters). I also recommend reading the brewing water primer. That helped me alot. This assumes that you pitch plenty of healthy yeast, aerate well and control fermentation temperature. Hope this helps.



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