Can you pitch too much yeast? - Home Brew Forums
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Old 07-10-2012, 06:00 PM   #1
jsv1204
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Going to try a starter next time around. Figured I would try to err on the high side - just checking the consequences of over-pitching.

Cheers!

 
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Old 07-10-2012, 06:02 PM   #2
TyTanium
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Yes, you can. Generally attributed to a dull beer. Shoot for +/- 20%.

 
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Old 07-10-2012, 06:30 PM   #3
duboman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsv1204
Going to try a starter next time around. Figured I would try to err on the high side - just checking the consequences of over-pitching.

Cheers!
Go to yeastcalc.com or mrmalty.com
Plug in the numbers and you'll see what size starter you need, takes all the guesswork out of it
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Old 07-10-2012, 06:33 PM   #4
duboman
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Go to yeastcalc.com mrmalty.com
Plug the numbers and there is no guesswork, it will tell you what size starter you need
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Old 07-10-2012, 06:51 PM   #5
cmybeer
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I think (read, I'm not positive) that if you overpitch on a yeast that provides a lot of flavor and aroma to the beer you could see some consequences from doing so. From what I gather most of those flavors and aromas are by byproducts of the yeast reproduction during the lag phase and early fermentation and if there are already a ton of healthy yeast cells they will not need to reproduce as much, therefore leaving less yeasty aromas and flavors. Now if it's a super clean and neutral yeast, I think you're alright.

This is my thinking. Please someone smarter than me correct me if I'm wrong....

 
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Old 07-10-2012, 10:46 PM   #6
nulfis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmybeer View Post
I think (read, I'm not positive) that if you overpitch on a yeast that provides a lot of flavor and aroma to the beer you could see some consequences from doing so. From what I gather most of those flavors and aromas are by byproducts of the yeast reproduction during the lag phase and early fermentation and if there are already a ton of healthy yeast cells they will not need to reproduce as much, therefore leaving less yeasty aromas and flavors. Now if it's a super clean and neutral yeast, I think you're alright.

This is my thinking. Please someone smarter than me correct me if I'm wrong....
Yeah, that's basically it. Overpitching will significantly alter the initial growth phase of the yeast, which normally will contribute important beer flavors.

 
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Old 07-10-2012, 10:59 PM   #7
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Everything I've read/heard has said that while you can indeed overpitch, it's actually very difficult to do on a homebrew scale unless you're putting your wort directly on top of a yeast cake (and even then, I've done it a couple times in a pinch with no issues, however only with 1056, never something particularly phenolic or estery. YMMV). Yeasties are much more forgiving of overpitching than they are underpitching. So basically, I wouldn't worry too much about overpitching.
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Old 07-10-2012, 11:14 PM   #8
Gameface
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I'd say you could double the recommended starter size and not be overpitching, or at least not pitching so many yeast that it will have a negative effect on the flavor. Much easier to underpitch than to overpitch, imho.

 
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Old 07-10-2012, 11:32 PM   #9
sonex
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I tend to error on the side of over pitching than under pitching. Since your basically making and educated guess on the viability of your liquid yeast and the growth in the starter.

 
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Old 07-11-2012, 12:23 PM   #10
jsv1204
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Thanks for the info, all - cheers!

 
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