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Old 07-09-2012, 04:45 PM   #1
goblinbrewer
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Jul 2012
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I was recently told I should not taste my ale the same day I bottle it. It makes sence I guess as I know any wine, cider, beer what ever will improve with age. But how long should I leave before I crack it open and enjoy the fruits of my labor?

 
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:47 PM   #2
Fletcher21
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I would recommend 3-4 weeks. However it all depends on the type of beer and how you like it as the flavor profile will continue to change with age.

 
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:47 PM   #3
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The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.

And just because a beer is carbed doesn't mean it still doesn't taste like a$$ and need more time for the off flavors to condition out. You have green beer.

Temp and gravity are the two factors that contribute to the time it takes to carb beer. But if a beer's not ready yet, or seems low carbed, and you added the right amount of sugar to it, then it's not stalled, it's just not time yet.

Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here; Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience."

Additionally once the three weeks or so has passed, chiling them down for a few days (not just a few hours or over night as most new brewers want to do ) will help the carbonation settle.
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:48 PM   #4
CTownBrewer
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I usually try my first one after about 2 weeks. That's enough time to carbonate most lower alcohol styles. If it's a high gravity brew, it takes longer to carbonate, so I'd give that 3-4 weeks before trying one.
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:49 PM   #5
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Depends on the beer... most can be consumed after a couple of weeks (assuming you are carbonating during this time) I brew a Hefe that I KEG... since I force Carbonate I can start brewing on day one and be drinking it day 17...

 
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:50 PM   #6
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+1 on Revvy's post. I had a Christmas Ale at about 8.5% ABV take 2 months to carbonate.
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Old 07-09-2012, 05:11 PM   #7
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All the beers ive made except one have been 7abv or higher... Most have been fully carbed in 10 days. Now, it may need further conditioning(most do) but they are still fully carbed. Like my Coffee Brown I just made, 8.3abv, has been carbed and delicious after 10 days in the bottle and been drinking it since. I will say though, the beer will tell you when its ready not the other way around, and it very well may take the brew 8 weeks to get there. The yeast are our chauffeur, all we can do is say when were there, the rest is up to them.
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Old 07-09-2012, 05:14 PM   #8
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I always wait 4 weeks in the bottle before I try my first one. If you are new and getting antsy, by all means chill and taste one at 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, etc. It'll help answer the question to your palate much more completely than any words typed in here. However, be sure to keep the lion's share of your batch conditioning for at least 4 weeks. The best tasting bottle is always the last one.

 
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Old 07-09-2012, 05:31 PM   #9
billl
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Who told you you shouldn't taste your beer? I always taste my beer prior to bottling. Your taste buds are better than a hydrometer. Just be sure to taste it before you add the priming sugar.

Once it is in bottles, it starts to carbonate almost immediately. yeast + sugar = CO2. Depending on the temps and health of the yeast, it might take the yeast a week or months to consume all the sugar. Alcohol is toxic to yeast, so generally, the higher the alcohol, the less healthy the yeast, and the longer it takes to carb up. In my experience, the vast majority of my beers are carbed in 2-3 weeks.... but these are 7% or less brews, not 12% beasts.

 
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Old 07-09-2012, 05:47 PM   #10
goblinbrewer
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It was my girlfriends older sister who does a bit of home brewing herself. Thanks every one! I didn't even .know there was a specific amount of suger needed for carbing up! I always just used a small suger spoon in each bottle! Will defiantly be carbing up properly next time!

 
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