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Old 07-09-2012, 03:58 AM   #1
derekge
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Dec 2011
San Diego, CA
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I washed some Belgian Ale WLP550 and I can't really tell which layer is the yeast. Is it the thin, white layer just above the bottom trub layer or is it the middle murky layer?

Also: how do I pitch this? If the middle murky layer is the yeast then wouldn't I want to siphon out that part and pitch that only? I'm not doing a starter and I don't need much since I'm doing a 1 gal. batch.

Thanks for the tips everybody - cheers!
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Old 07-09-2012, 05:02 AM   #2
MrOH
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Sep 2011
Philadelphia, PA
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it's the thin, white layer. The middle, murky layer is just stuff that hasn't had the chance to settle yet. you can always cold crash and wash again to get rid of more trub, if you so desire.
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Old 07-09-2012, 05:10 AM   #3
nufad
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Jun 2012
Vancouver, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrOH View Post
it's the thin, white layer. The middle, murky layer is just stuff that hasn't had the chance to settle yet. you can always cold crash and wash again to get rid of more trub, if you so desire.
I also just washed yeast for the first time today, and followed the steps in the yeast washing sticky (link). I thought the dead and dying yeast sank with the trub, and the healthier yeast stayed in suspension longer. This allows you to "wash" the yeast (i.e. physically separate the healthy yeast from everything else) sequentially such that you end up with mostly healthy yeast in your mason jar.

 
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Old 07-09-2012, 03:20 PM   #4
derekge
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Dec 2011
San Diego, CA
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Thanks for the replies. Looks like the middle section of the yeast is settling. I'm still curious as to how I pitch this?
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Old 07-09-2012, 03:38 PM   #5
jCOSbrew
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Feb 2012
Colorado Springs, CO
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Decant/pour off most of the liquid, swirl the remaining liquid and yeast, let it warm to room temp, and pitch to a starter or directly to the fermenter.
Unless you have a large volume of fresh yeast, a starter is recommended to increase cell count and prove viability.

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