How to make a yeast starter - Pictorial (updated) - Page 6 - Home Brew Forums
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Old 07-14-2012, 03:36 AM   #51
Sulli
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Mar 2008
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Thanks for all the comments and suggestions.

I've updated the pictorial to reflect some of the comments above, such as: only needing to boil for 1 minute and covering the wort when chilling.



 
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Old 07-16-2012, 04:37 PM   #52
bernerbrau
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This is great advice for ales.

However, for lagers, you should not be pitching starters at high krausen. The esters produced will be present in the finished beer. You should let a lager starter ferment completely at room temperature, then crash the starter for 24 hours, and decant the liquid before pitching the thick yeast cake.

I would title this "How to make an ale yeast starter", but I'm picky like that.

 
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Old 07-16-2012, 10:07 PM   #53
DonutMuncher
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Pretty cool graphic, nice job. I'll be making my first starter in the next day or two, so this is a nice little reference. I think I'll be refrigerating the final product and decanting most of the liquid out... because I'm paranoid about that 1L+ going into my beer (I know, it shouldn't affect the final product.. but I'm paranoid!).

 
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Old 07-18-2012, 04:20 PM   #54
Sulli
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bernerbrau View Post
This is great advice for ales.

However, for lagers, you should not be pitching starters at high krausen. The esters produced will be present in the finished beer. You should let a lager starter ferment completely at room temperature, then crash the starter for 24 hours, and decant the liquid before pitching the thick yeast cake.

I would title this "How to make an ale yeast starter", but I'm picky like that.
The procedure for making an ale starter is exactly the same as the procedure for making a lager starter.

In both cases fermentation should be pretty much complete within about 24 hours.

What you do with the starter after it ferments has nothing to do with the actual process of "making a yeast starter".

 
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Old 07-18-2012, 04:26 PM   #55
CircusHooker
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Jun 2012
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Hmmm....Well I made my first starter last night, did the 1/2 cup dme to 2 cups water. Added the yeast to the wort a bit warm but it's a Saison - it seemed to ferment fine.

Thank you so much for the wonderful tutorials!

 
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Old 07-18-2012, 07:34 PM   #56
BrewByLos
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May 2012
Turlock, CA
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Just made my first starter. Thanks for the great tutorial! Much appreciated.

 
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Old 07-24-2012, 06:21 PM   #57
Sulli
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CircusHooker View Post
Hmmm....Well I made my first starter last night, did the 1/2 cup dme to 2 cups water. Added the yeast to the wort a bit warm but it's a Saison - it seemed to ferment fine.

Thank you so much for the wonderful tutorials!
The 1/2 cup DME to 2 cups water formula that has been floating around the forums forever, really isn't very accurate.

  • 1/2 cup of DME weighs in at around 70 grams; 2 cups of water is 473 milliliters.
  • 70g of DME into 473ml of water gives a starting gravity of about 1.056.
  • After boiling for the 'recommended' 10 minutes (which is also inaccurate) the gravity will be even higher because of evaporation, more like 1.065+


--White labs and Wyeast both recommend a gravity of no more than 1.040 for a yeast starter. The lower gravity helps maximize the health of the yeast.


Moreover, if you're looking to propagate additional yeast, a 473ml starter isn't going to produce a whole lot of new cells.

IMO, If I'm going to take the time to make a starter, I want to end up with plenty of yeast for my efforts.

A 1000ml starter will just about double the cell count. (with intermittent shaking.)



--The old pictorial also recommends using an airlock on your starter; but we now understand that using an airlock will decrease the amount of gas exchange in the starter, thereby inhibiting growth.


 
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Old 07-24-2012, 07:29 PM   #58
Cregar
 
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Great graphic... a high res one would be great for printing out

 
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Old 07-24-2012, 07:40 PM   #59
Sulli
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cregar View Post
Great graphic... a high res one would be great for printing out
*Hi-Rez version here.

 
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Old 07-24-2012, 09:04 PM   #60
Cregar
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sulli View Post
*Hi-Rez version here
Thank ya :-)

 
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