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Old 06-29-2012, 03:18 AM   #1
m0808
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Jun 2011
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I am sitting here at work looking at buying a grain mill. Then i started to wonder why dont i make one. Im a machinist and have all the tools and equipment . Does anyone know where i could find some specs or ideas. Thanks



 
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Old 06-29-2012, 03:21 AM   #2
mendesm
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Old 06-29-2012, 03:49 AM   #3
krazydave
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I've seen a handful of machinists post the ones they made on here. A few have been fairly recent too.

 
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Old 06-29-2012, 03:56 AM   #4
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Time and effort my friend...you can buy a corona mill for 20-30 bucks or a roller mill for a hundred plus....how much time, and or money do you have???

 
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Old 06-29-2012, 05:43 AM   #5
lincoln
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I'm working on one, so far i have the rollers done. I made them out of sprinkler pipe. The frame I plan to make out of 6061.
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Old 06-29-2012, 02:34 PM   #6
cockybitz
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Testimonials from this thread indicate that this should hold up for quite a long time. using your machine abilities you can put a knurl on the rollers, which is really all that is necessary.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/usin...l-grain-75784/

 
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:36 AM   #7
Junkster
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Yeah, I made one a few years ago from caster wheels found in a scrapyard. A friend knurled them on a lathe and cut some threads on a shaft and I've used it for several years. I welded up the frame and built a wooden hopper and run it with a $5 motor from a yard sale. I might be able to find a couple pics if anyone is interested.......

 
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:42 AM   #8
jfrizzell
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Jun 2007
Iowa
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I drew one up in CAD a few years back and had my BIL help me machine the parts. It has eccentrics to adjust the gap. If you're interested, I'll see if I can find my plans.
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Old 07-03-2012, 03:42 AM   #9
m0808
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i would be interested in any pictures or plans. thanks.

 
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Old 07-03-2012, 12:57 PM   #10
carlisle_bob
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Hi

If you do it, a few things to think about:

The stuff you see has bronze bearings rather than ball bearings. Ball bearings don't take shock (from rocks in the grain) as well. They also load up with dust from the grind much quicker.

Solid rollers are the way to go. The same rocks will dent up a hollow roller pretty fast. Each dent lets un-crushed grain through and reduces your efficiency.

Bigger diameter is always better. If you have some 3" round stock, that's going to be the thing to use. Spend some quality time putting groves in it.

Gears between the rollers seem to be a "some do / some don't" kind of thing. They make the adjustable spacing on the rollers harder to implement.

Stainless steel is also a good idea if you have it lying around. Wet grinding grain is indeed something you might want to do.

A half inch (or larger) drive shaft is a good thing for pulleys. Anything over 1/2" will make it a bit tough to drive with common drills.

If you are making up the crusher, make up a proper mounting plate for it at the same time. Plywood is *not* a proper mounting plate. While you are at it, make up a proper mount for the hopper as well ...

If you are making up end plates and a mount, the drive needs to go somewhere. Better to allow to much room than not enough.

For the ultimate design, the dust from the grind is a bit of a hazard (fire, explosion, end of the world ...). An air motor would be a *very* cool way to run one of these.

Now how to justify the new mortgage based on the material list for the new crusher...

Bob



 
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