Coldbreak Brewing HERMS Giveaway!

HomeBrewSupply AMCYL Brew Kettle Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Wine Making Forum > Degassing wine
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-10-2007, 03:37 AM   #1
Dark_Ale
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Liberty, Texas
Posts: 647
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default Degassing wine

Ok about a month ago I started a blackberry wine. I notice it made the room smell like sulphur but it went away. The wine was in a secondary today, I ran a gravity it as .990. So I racked a third time. I notice the sulfur smell, but the wine does not taste bad. It's pretty good for a young wine. I have been told I might need to degass. This is a new one on me because I thought you were suppose to keep Oxygen out of wine. I used montrachet yeast(dry). I only added camden tablets one per gallon in the primary. When I went to secondary I added no camden and today I added no camden. What should I do about the smell, you think it will go away?


Dark_Ale is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2007, 03:55 AM   #2
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: UP of Michigan
Posts: 65,415
Liked 6043 Times on 4307 Posts
Likes Given: 1555

Default

Sometimes degassing is necessary especially for kit wines, but not usually. The only time you need to degas is when the wine is actually gassy, though. I've NEVER had to degas a country wine. Montrachet yeast is known to be a stinky one, and it will dissapate with time. Rack when you have lees of about 1/4 inch or so, about every 30-45 days. I add campden every other racking to protect the wine from oxidation and foreign yeasts and bacteria.

In 6 months, it will smell great and in a year or two it'll really be good! I would not bottle before the 8 month mark.


__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

Follow me on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
But I'm pretty boring so don't expect much!
https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
Yooper is online now
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2007, 04:23 AM   #3
Dark_Ale
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Liberty, Texas
Posts: 647
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

In the future I have a muscadine wine and a (PeachWhiteGrape). Can anyone recommend a differant yeast other than montrachet that will do a good job. Thanks for the help!
Dark_Ale is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2007, 11:30 AM   #4
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: UP of Michigan
Posts: 65,415
Liked 6043 Times on 4307 Posts
Likes Given: 1555

Default

For the peach one, I'd probably use cotes des blancs, to bring out the fruitiness. I've never used muscadines, so I don't know what I'd use for that.

Here's a great link about yeast strains on Jack Keller's site:
http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/strains.asp
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

Follow me on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
But I'm pretty boring so don't expect much!
https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
Yooper is online now
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2010, 07:00 PM   #5
kullhacks
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Stumptown
Posts: 2
Default

I just racked a batch of blackberry wine I started in August; it is coming along nicely! The past month or so has gotten rid of the yeast taste and degassed it almost all the way.

Fermentation was done long ago, so this was just a 'bulk aging' rack. I am concerned that I may be getting too much headspace on top of my wine after racking (wine comes just barely up the shoulder of the carboy) and that oxidation may become an issue...should I try to add CO2 to the carboy or just rely on the camden tab every other rack?

I jury rigged a CO2 layer by reacting vinegar and baking soda in a pitcher and trying to pour the resulting CO2 into the carboy to displace some of the oxygen; the liquid in the bottom of the pitcher didn't leave the pitcher! (CO2 is heavier than O2, so the displacement works on paper, though you feel silly pouring an invisible gas into something). Is there a more practical way to do this?
kullhacks is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2010, 08:42 PM   #6
vvolf27
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Washington
Posts: 77
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

buy a cheap bottle of like wine and add to your carboy. Or you could buy glass marbles clean sanitize and add them to the carboy to create displacement.
__________________
"However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results."
~Sir Winston Churchill
vvolf27 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2010, 11:13 PM   #7
Emerald
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 237
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts

Default

I made a white grape peach mead using the lavlin EC-1118 and during the first racking I tasted the sample and it was very good- not done yet by far, but very tasty. The peach was really showing thru.


Emerald is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Degassing Wine? DutchK9 Wine Making Forum 30 12-07-2012 06:55 PM
Wine Degassing Wild Duk Wine Making Forum 16 01-16-2009 06:06 AM
Degassing wine technique arcsum68 Wine Making Forum 11 09-02-2008 10:36 PM
More on degassing skinfiddler Wine Making Forum 4 03-26-2008 05:02 AM
Degassing GabrielKnight Wine Making Forum 1 12-17-2007 10:33 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS