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Old 06-19-2012, 02:55 AM   #1
stevehollx
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Dec 2010
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I'm thinking about doing a dark saison, and throwing some brett in with it.

How long do you folks normally age a saison with brett for? Is 6 months in a secondary sufficient, or do people typically go closer to a year out?
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Old 06-19-2012, 07:10 AM   #2
RiverRat280
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After 4 months I have good Brett flavor and only gets better later. If your not adding pedio 6 will be fine. It seems I have good flavor at 2-4 months but it continues to meld and get better up to a year then after it changes less

 
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Old 06-19-2012, 01:03 PM   #3
smokinghole
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I age them as short as possible. I basically let it get down to a gravity where I'm comfortable bottling. Then prime for about a volume less than what I want the ber to end up. That allows me to get them into the bottle and the brett can take up the rest of the carbonation. This prevents having a 6 gal carboy or larger hanging out for six months or so. I've been doing it this way for two years now and I have to say that I won't do it any other way with saisons. Bulk aging is a waste of carboy space if you ask me for a beer like saisons. You have to consider that the famous saison producers don't hold their saison for six months and then release the beer. So in the time it takes you to bulk age a saison for six months you could have made 3-4 more batches and got them into bottles. Of course this all depends on the yeast strain.
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Old 06-19-2012, 05:08 PM   #4
KYB
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smokinghole View Post
I age them as short as possible. I basically let it get down to a gravity where I'm comfortable bottling. Then prime for about a volume less than what I want the ber to end up. That allows me to get them into the bottle and the brett can take up the rest of the carbonation. This prevents having a 6 gal carboy or larger hanging out for six months or so. I've been doing it this way for two years now and I have to say that I won't do it any other way with saisons. Bulk aging is a waste of carboy space if you ask me for a beer like saisons. You have to consider that the famous saison producers don't hold their saison for six months and then release the beer. So in the time it takes you to bulk age a saison for six months you could have made 3-4 more batches and got them into bottles. Of course this all depends on the yeast strain.
My plan exactly. I have a bunch of brett beers going, and bottled one after 3 months primary (I pitched brett with the sacc). I'm always needing more fermenters. I've also heard the beer really starts to develop when bottle conditioned, not so much when bulk aging with no pressure.

 
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Old 06-19-2012, 05:25 PM   #5
ReverseApacheMaster
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My brett saison gets bone dry and it's very slow to it, so I have to let it sit 6-9 months, otherwise I'll have overcarbonated bottles. Not really sure why my fellers are so slow but they are.

 
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Old 06-19-2012, 05:26 PM   #6
pohldogg
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Bottle at stable gravity. I usually do 6-8 weeks because I'm lazy about taking samples. Then enjoy them as the flavor changes over time. Plus you gotta keep those fermenters turning.

 
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Old 06-19-2012, 06:26 PM   #7
Almighty
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Bulk vs. Bottle aging really just depends on gravity stability for me. I haven't noticed a big difference on flavor, but I haven't done a side by side. The nice thing about Saison is that the yeast can drop the gravity so low and you can bottle earlier without fear of over-carbing. I would not recommend this for other styles like Flanders Red because the gravity will continue to drop for so long. And if your Saison yeast is not dropping the gravity quick enough (relative to your space needs), add a highly attenuative yeast like Wyeast 3711. This shouldn't change the flavor profile much or at all and allow you to bottle sooner.

 
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Old 06-19-2012, 08:30 PM   #8
ReverseApacheMaster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Almighty View Post
Bulk vs. Bottle aging really just depends on gravity stability for me. I haven't noticed a big difference on flavor, but I haven't done a side by side.
You can taste the difference between the bottle bucket and a carbonated bottle.

 
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Old 06-19-2012, 08:40 PM   #9
Almighty
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I meant to say that I don't think the flavor is any different for a beer that was aged in a carboy for 6 months vs. a bottle for 6 months. I agree the taste changes dramatically with time, but I don't think aging vessel matters.

 
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Old 06-20-2012, 12:09 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReverseApacheMaster View Post
My brett saison gets bone dry and it's very slow to it, so I have to let it sit 6-9 months, otherwise I'll have overcarbonated bottles. Not really sure why my fellers are so slow but they are.
What brett and saison yeast are you using? I've been using ECY03 and it can get my beer down to 1.003 rather quick. Maybe my blend is getting out of balance but I like where it's going.
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