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Old 06-19-2012, 12:43 PM   #11
bobbrews
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I think 8 oz. is underhopped for an IIPA. They usually have about double the hops of a regular IPA, which is hopped at about 5-8 oz average.



 
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Old 06-19-2012, 12:53 PM   #12
MisterTipsy
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Anything less than a pound of hops is pure weaksauce!



 
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Old 06-19-2012, 01:08 PM   #13
permo
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For what its worth, my recent IPA's have been doing a "hop rest" at flameout and the results have been so dramatic that I have pretty much stopped using 10 to 5 Minute hop additions. At flameout I quickly chill to 200 degrees, then I shut off the chiller and add a LOAD of hops. Then I let this rest for 20-30 minutes to try and emulate the "whirlpool", from commercial breweries. Its a great way to get a crazy hop flavor and aroma and I highly reccomend it.

 
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Old 06-19-2012, 01:15 PM   #14
bobbrews
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Quote:
Originally Posted by permo View Post
At flameout I quickly chill to 200 degrees, then I shut off the chiller and add a LOAD of hops. Then I let this rest for 20-30 minutes to try and emulate the "whirlpool", from commercial breweries. Its a great way to get a crazy hop flavor and aroma and I highly reccomend it.
That's only 12 degrees shy of boiling temp... which isn't going to make much of a difference. What you're noticing is probably due to doubling up on your normal amount of whirlpool hops.

Try rapidly cooling to about 150 F with a wort chiller in less than 10 minutes, then slow-cooling down to 65 F in 30 minutes or more with an ice bath AND the whirlpool hops. Talk about a dramatic difference. I've found that the sweet spot for the whirlpool steep is about 90-140 F. That is where the aromatic hop oils beneficial to IPAs, like myrcene, seem to be harnessed the best.

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Old 06-19-2012, 03:08 PM   #15
TyTanium
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbrews View Post
Try rapidly cooling to about 150 F with a wort chiller in less than 10 minutes, then slow-cooling down to 65 F in 30 minutes or more with an ice bath AND the whirlpool hops. Talk about a dramatic difference. I've found that the sweet spot for the whirlpool steep is about 90-140 F. That is where the aromatic hop oils beneficial to IPAs, like myrcene, seem to be harnessed the best.
I can vouch for this technique...just tried for the first time and was blown away by the results. It works.

Once I hit 150 I tossed in the hops, put the lid on and slowed the flow-rate on the chiller to a trickle. Cleaned mash tun & prepped carboy while steeping, so didn't really add much time to brewday.

 
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Old 06-19-2012, 04:15 PM   #16
permo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbrews View Post
That's only 12 degrees shy of boiling temp... which isn't going to make much of a difference. What you're noticing is probably due to doubling up on your normal amount of whirlpool hops.

Try rapidly cooling to about 150 F with a wort chiller in less than 10 minutes, then slow-cooling down to 65 F in 30 minutes or more with an ice bath AND the whirlpool hops. Talk about a dramatic difference. I've found that the sweet spot for the whirlpool steep is about 90-140 F. That is where the aromatic hop oils beneficial to IPAs, like myrcene, seem to be harnessed the best.
AWESOME. I will try this next time. I noticed that with the technique I outlined above I did get a very noticiable difference, but I will chill to 150 next time and then toss in the hops. Maybe half at 200 degrees and half at 150 degrees. Two different dimensions of hop aroma and flavor!

Thanks for the tip....~!

 
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Old 06-19-2012, 07:50 PM   #17
tdogg
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To the OP, if you haven't figured this out yet, big IIPA's can get really spendy to brew. This might be a good candidate for a half batch brew.

 
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Old 06-20-2012, 01:27 AM   #18
everty2007
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I have a stupid question, I have not heard of the hop "whirlpool" before. How is this done, just with the chiller sorry this is my first IPA and is much different than the wheat beers with minimal hop additions I have stuck to thus far.

 
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Old 06-20-2012, 12:16 PM   #19
bobbrews
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I wrote about how it is done. See above. You can't use your wort chiller for the whole duration of chilling, unless you feed a very small amount of water into the coils after the wort has reached about 150 F. This ensures that the hops remain in the "warm" (not hot) wort for a bit of time.

 
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Old 06-21-2012, 05:35 AM   #20
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Sorry and thanks just wasn't sure where the whirlpool term was referring to



 
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