Batch sparge temp calc help? - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Batch sparge temp calc help?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-12-2012, 01:35 PM   #1
Rottnme
Recipes 
 
Jan 2007
Wiscownsin
Posts: 124
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts



I have found with my system that I get the best and most consistent results when I do a double batch sparge. My issue is that I want to be more consistent with hitting temps in the 165-170F range when I sparge rather than having the first sparge get me 3/4 of the way there and the second getting me where I want to be.

I typically figure out my volumes such that I determine my mash water volume and then work it out so that I have approximately 1qt per pound left over for each batch sparge. Therefor what I have is a determined amount of sparge water that needs to be at a determined temperature to bring the mash temp up to this mash out temp. I am looking for a calculater to help me do this on the fly as I heat the sparge water.

A little about my system and process that may help... I use a converted cooler mash tun, and as is to be expected, I lose a couple of degrees (2-6 depending) during the mash. Then, when draining my runnings, I lose a few more degrees. This is where the problem comes in. When that hot thermal mass of water leaves the mash it cools quickly and can lose as much as 10-15F during running out and before I sparge in. I want to be able to take a temp of the grain at this point, plug in in to a calculation and have a required temp for my determined amount of sparge water.

Has anyone ever created or found a calulator that will do this?

Thanks, Rott

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 02:15 PM   #2
TyTanium
Recipes 
 
Nov 2011
Posts: 3,952
Liked 556 Times on 391 Posts


I don't have a good calculator for you.

But in my personal opinion, this is not worth the effort. Just get the sparge water hot. I have found no appreciable, statistical difference in efficiency using 150 versus 180 degree sparge water. Unless you're measuring with precise lab equipment, the difference is well within most system's margin of error and cannot be measured to be statistically significant.

It's definitely possible to calculate it, but I wouldn't slow my brew day to "nail" this. I just don't think it's important.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 12:23 PM   #3
Rottnme
Recipes 
 
Jan 2007
Wiscownsin
Posts: 124
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Yeah, I know it's not really needed but as part of my anally retentive nature it makes me feel like i'm doing a better job. I just figured that someone here may be able to point me to something like this.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 01:05 PM   #4
duboman
Recipes 
 
Jul 2011
Glenview, IL
Posts: 6,368
Liked 508 Times on 470 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rottnme View Post
Yeah, I know it's not really needed but as part of my anally retentive nature it makes me feel like i'm doing a better job. I just figured that someone here may be able to point me to something like this.
Don't waste your time, the temperature of the water you use to sparge only needs to be above 168 as you are only rinsing the sugars from the grist at this point, there is no conversion occurring and since the water is not soaking for any period of time there should really be no significant heat loss as the sparge water drains through the grain bed. I usually try to hit around 170 +/- in two equal batches. If your cooler has enough space you can also do one larger sparge at a slightly slower rate

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 02:02 PM   #5
Stauffbier
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
Stauffbier's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2011
El Paso, TX
Posts: 5,118
Liked 1048 Times on 641 Posts


This is the calculator I use. You can dial in your strike and mash temp for step one and then it will take you to a screen for step two. There's a section where you can enter "current temp" which is where you would enter the temp of the grain bed after lautering the mash...
http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/infusion.html

It works great for calculating your infusion temps. As mentioned above, the sparge temp isn't critical as long as you don't get the grain bed temp higher than 170F. That doesn't mean the water can't be higher than 170F, though... As soon as it hits the grain the temp drops just like when you dough in. With all of this said I plan on experimenting with "cold sparging" on my next batch. I hear a lot of good things about it..

Good Luck

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 08:03 PM   #6
jkendal
Recipes 
 
Jun 2012
Burton, TX
Posts: 219
Liked 12 Times on 9 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rottnme View Post
I have found with my system that I get the best and most consistent results when I do a double batch sparge. My issue is that I want to be more consistent with hitting temps in the 165-170F range when I sparge rather than having the first sparge get me 3/4 of the way there and the second getting me where I want to be.

I typically figure out my volumes such that I determine my mash water volume and then work it out so that I have approximately 1qt per pound left over for each batch sparge. Therefor what I have is a determined amount of sparge water that needs to be at a determined temperature to bring the mash temp up to this mash out temp. I am looking for a calculater to help me do this on the fly as I heat the sparge water.

A little about my system and process that may help... I use a converted cooler mash tun, and as is to be expected, I lose a couple of degrees (2-6 depending) during the mash. Then, when draining my runnings, I lose a few more degrees. This is where the problem comes in. When that hot thermal mass of water leaves the mash it cools quickly and can lose as much as 10-15F during running out and before I sparge in. I want to be able to take a temp of the grain at this point, plug in in to a calculation and have a required temp for my determined amount of sparge water.

Has anyone ever created or found a calulator that will do this?

Thanks, Rott
Keep in mind that once you've reached conversion, it doesn't matter what the temp of your sparge water is as long as it isn't so high that it leeks tannins into your wort. I've used the tastybrew calculator and it will get you close enough. And like the others have said, if you don't hit your temps exactly, don't sweat it. It isn't critical. Also, doing a double batch sparge might get you a point or two of eff. but in my view isn't worth the extra work - unless you LIKE doing extra work. After all, this IS our passion.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2012, 03:24 AM   #7
dutchman22
Recipes 
 
Dec 2012
Posts: 2

Gents,

I'm with the original dude who posted this. I have been racking my brain trying to determine this in order to satisfy a desire to stop enzyme activity after the 1st runoff. It become more complicated than the tasteybrew calc because this calculator will indeed tell you the amount of water to add to reach 168 (or desired mahout), however in a batch sparge the idea is to add 1/2 the desired wort volume. That's where the tasteybrew calculator falls short. Hypothetically, what if i am only to add 1.75 gallons to hit 168, bur need 3 gallons to reach my desired final pre-boil volume. Common sense tells me to at that point just add the remaining amount at 165 degrees to ensure it doesn't get too high. Am I correct in assuming this?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2012, 03:57 AM   #8
Stauffbier
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
Stauffbier's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2011
El Paso, TX
Posts: 5,118
Liked 1048 Times on 641 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by dutchman22 View Post
Gents,

I'm with the original dude who posted this. I have been racking my brain trying to determine this in order to satisfy a desire to stop enzyme activity after the 1st runoff. It become more complicated than the tasteybrew calc because this calculator will indeed tell you the amount of water to add to reach 168 (or desired mahout), however in a batch sparge the idea is to add 1/2 the desired wort volume. That's where the tasteybrew calculator falls short. Hypothetically, what if i am only to add 1.75 gallons to hit 168, bur need 3 gallons to reach my desired final pre-boil volume. Common sense tells me to at that point just add the remaining amount at 165 degrees to ensure it doesn't get too high. Am I correct in assuming this?
I just play with the infusion temp on tastybrew until I get it to come out to the volume I need.

In other words if I just need 3 gallons of sparge water to make up my boil volume, then I'll start by entering an infusion temp of 185F. If it says I'll need more than 3 gallons, then I just raise the temp on the calculator until it gets to the 3 gallon mark. I've had to raise it as high as 202F before to get the grain bed to 168-170F.

I hope that makes sense and answers your question...
__________________
Bier war sein letztes wort dann trugen ihn die Englein fort...


 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Batch vs. Fly vs. No Sparge MattHollingsworth General Techniques 57 09-08-2009 08:01 AM
A Quick Sparge Water Temp Question. mew General Techniques 14 12-01-2008 09:10 PM
batch sparge clarification anderj General Techniques 5 02-15-2008 08:25 PM
Batch Sparge Dark_Ale General Techniques 2 04-10-2007 01:47 PM
To batch sparge first AG! hoplobster General Techniques 1 02-06-2007 05:17 AM


Forum Jump