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Old 06-12-2012, 12:37 AM   #1
wuilliez
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Default Aging a Russian Imperial Stout.

For Christmas, I was going to brew a Russian imperial stout in July and age it until December for the family. What would be the best way to age it? It's an LME recipe from the brew supply place I go to. I plan to bottle it due to the fact I lack keg funds. Should I bottle it after I reach back to back readings, or should I let it sit in the fermenter and age?


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Old 06-12-2012, 12:40 AM   #2
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What's your OG? If you're talking 1.080, I'd give it 6 weeks in the primary fermentor and then bottle age. If it's bigger than 1.100 I would probably transfer to a secondary and give it 3 months bulk aging and then the rest of time in bottles.


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Old 06-12-2012, 12:57 AM   #3
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Based on my experience, I would age it for about a month in primary (depending on whether gravity has stabilized) and then transfer it to a secondary to avoid off flavors from the trub. Let it sit for a while and bottle. Maybe throw some oak cubes that have been soaked in whiskey in the secondary, but if the abv is already high then maybe not...
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Old 06-14-2012, 02:00 PM   #4
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I would age it in secondary for a couple months as well, especially if it's high ABV.
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Old 06-14-2012, 06:22 PM   #5
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What's the rationale behind this? How is this different from aging it in the bottles?
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Old 06-14-2012, 07:47 PM   #6
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But if it ages in a secondary for a couple months it might be hard to bottle condition since very little yeast would be in suspension after that amount of time. So keep that in mind.
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Old 06-15-2012, 02:46 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatorBeer View Post
What's the rationale behind this? How is this different from aging it in the bottles?
I'm trying to find the answer to the same questions, and I also would like to know why. I've got a stout that I've been aging in the secondary for a month. I'd like to empty out my carboy so I can use it for other beers. Would my stout be better if left to age in the secondary? My OG is 1.050. If you could also give the reason why, and not just a simple bottle it, or leave it that would be wonderful. Thanks
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Old 06-15-2012, 02:50 AM   #8
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From my understanding, aging it in secondary will lend to a more uniform taste versus bottle conditioning. With a 1.050 beer I would waste any time with a secondary. But with a 1.10 + beer I would leave in secondary for 2 months or so before I bottled. This is for a stout of course, not an IPA or such. You can always add 1/4 packet of us-05 into the bottling bucket if you are worried about the beer carbing.
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Old 06-15-2012, 02:54 AM   #9
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^^ what he said. Each bottle is a little microclimate, and although they will be very similar you can and will detect differences between bottles if you bottle too soon.
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Old 06-16-2012, 12:15 AM   #10
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I made a 1.085 breakfast stout in may. Racke to secondary after a Month. My plan is to age until fall, bottle, and drink on xmas day.


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