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Old 06-06-2012, 10:54 AM   #1
bullinachinashop
 
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This is Danstar's new west coast ale yeast.

I used it on a Blonde test batch that I'm doing and it seemed to work well.
Pitched dry, I had activity in under 24 hours.
I fermented @ 61 and it had a nice Krausen.
Seems to be complete @ day 4 and has compacted nicely.
I'll be bottling this batch in about a week and will let you know how clean it is.
Bull

 
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Old 06-07-2012, 10:59 AM   #2
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Well I transfered this yesterday because I wanted the yeast to pitch into a new batch.
Hydro sample was very clean and I belive finished @ 1.008. OG was 1.047
If anything maybe a bit thin, but uncarbed it's hard to tell.

I pitched the yeast into a "Fizzy Yellow Beer" that I brewed yesterday and have a thick krausening and strong activity in under 12 hours @ 63.

So far so good!

 
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Old 06-07-2012, 09:32 PM   #3
BobBailey
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Never seen or heard of it. Where did you find it?

I'm ready to try Nottingham again after steering clear of it before they started repackaging. I do like US-05, but without cold crashing it takes a long time to compact. Maybe this new Danstar yeast is the ticket.

Bob

 
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Old 06-07-2012, 10:45 PM   #4
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Where did you get it? Are you sure its not K97?

 
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Old 06-07-2012, 11:12 PM   #5
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Here's the Danstar info on it.

BRY-97 American West Coast Yeast was selected from the Siebel Institute Culture Collection and is used by a number of commercial breweries to produce different types of ale. The propagation and drying process have been specifically designed to deliver high quality beer yeast that can be used simply and with reliability to help produce ales of the finest quality. No colours, preservatives or other unnatural substances have been used in its preparation. The yeast is produced in ISO 9002 certified plants.

Brewing Properties:

• Quick start and vigorous fermentation, which can be completed in 4 days above 17 C.
• Medium to high attenuation,
• Fermentation rate, fermentation time and degree of attenuation are dependent upon inoculation density, yeast handling, fermentation temperature and the nutritional quality of the wort.
• BRY-97 American West Coast Yeast is a flocculent strain. Settling can be promoted by cooling and use of fining agents and isinglass.
• The aroma is slightly estery, almost neutral and does not display malodours when properly handled. It may tend, because of flocculation, to slightly reduce hop bitter levels
• Best when used at traditional ale temperatures after re-hydration in the recommended manner.
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Old 06-07-2012, 11:19 PM   #6
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"It may tend, because of flocculation, to slightly reduce hop bitter levels"

high floc yeast reduce hop bittering levels? i hadn't heard that.

 
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Old 06-07-2012, 11:22 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrManifesto View Post
"It may tend, because of flocculation, to slightly reduce hop bitter levels"

high floc yeast reduce hop bittering levels? i hadn't heard that.
Well WLP 02 is highly flocculant and one of its properties is that is slightly mutes the hops...............
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Old 06-08-2012, 01:39 AM   #8
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When they say "Highly flocculant" I'd have to agree. I transfered the Blonde to secondary to get the yeast and the beer, after 6 days, was clearing nicely.

The re-pitch into the second beer was equally aggressive and I was surprised to see that the temp in the swamp cooler had raised to 70. I added more water to bring it down, but this one is aggressive to say the least.

The results are yet to be determined.

Bull

 
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Old 07-08-2012, 01:57 AM   #9
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Looking forward to hearing the taste results of your efforts.
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Old 07-08-2012, 04:59 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrManifesto View Post
"It may tend, because of flocculation, to slightly reduce hop bitter levels"

high floc yeast reduce hop bittering levels? i hadn't heard that.
the hop goodness sticks to the yeast cells and drops to the bottom with the yeast. (that is my unscientific explanation)

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