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Old 06-05-2012, 06:15 PM   #1
igliashon
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Feb 2012
Oakland, CA
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I don't know about the rest of y'all, but here in CA we apparently grow a lot of rice, and specifically a lot of interesting rice varieties. Red rice, pink rice, purple rice, black rice, wild rice, short-grain, long-grain, aromatic, sticky rice...etc. I know rice has a reputation for adding little to no taste, but I reckon that's mostly because it's raw polished white rice we're talking about. It seems like most of the people here using gluten-free grains in their beers tend to avoid rice unless they're using rice syrup, but has anyone experimented with using different varieties of rice and/or toasting the rice in different ways? Since many gluten-free grains seem to contribute undesirable or unusual tastes (buckwheat and sorghum being the strongest), or are prohibitively expensive (quinoa, teff, and amaranth seem to be expensive and/or hard to find), I'm wondering if maybe the ideal solution might be rice? I'm definitely going to try mashing some of the more unusual rices available to me (using amylase enzymes) and see what I can accomplish.

 
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Old 06-05-2012, 06:29 PM   #2
ChasidicCalvinist
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Feb 2012
Hookstown, PA
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I've never been concerned about getting conversion from the grains, but I am concerned about getting flavor and aroma from grains. That is why I haven't really used rice...but as you pointed out my natural inclination with rice is to chose white rice. I'm very interested in how your purple rice beer turns out.
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Old 06-05-2012, 07:13 PM   #3
frothdaddy
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Jul 2007
Miami Beach, FL
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Here's an interesting (albeit old) thread re: making an exclusively rice brew:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/rice...scratch-25338/

It looks like the question is whether you could get around the fat content of the bran while still maintaining the more complex flavors of those exotic rices.

I'd be very interested to see your results with the different rices.

 
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Old 06-05-2012, 08:23 PM   #4
muench1
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Jan 2012
Santa Cruz, CA
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I made some delicious "Madagascar pink" rice last week. You're right that there's a huge range of rice flavors and colors if you're really out there looking for them.

I would think if you boiled the rice and poured the water off the top you'd eliminate a great deal of any oil present, right? Looking at my favorite Lundberg Costco brown rice in the kitchen, it's 3% fat(oil) by mass.

I think toasting rice is a great idea and I've been meaning to do so for a while, I just haven't managed to brew much at all recently. I would think that if you take the tastiest brown rice you've got, boil it, pour the water off the top, and then toast it you'd manage to largely avoid oil problems.

 
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Old 06-05-2012, 09:30 PM   #5
igliashon
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Feb 2012
Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muench1 View Post
I would think that if you take the tastiest brown rice you've got, boil it, pour the water off the top, and then toast it you'd manage to largely avoid oil problems.
Precisely what I shall do. I find that most grains produce better toasted flavor when toasted after an extended hot water soak, rather than toasting when totally dry. I reckon I'll try this next week; I plan on doing two 1-gallon batches, one of a buckwheat mash and one of the rice. I'll probably use red rice, medium-toasted with a goal of hitting an amber ale.

 
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Old 06-06-2012, 07:00 AM   #6
mloster
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Jul 2011
Santa Barbara, CA
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Just as you can malt quinoa, millet, etc., couldn't you malt brown rice and use it as a grain in your beer? You could roast the malt to different lovibond to achieve specific flavors as is done with barley. I may have to give it a try.

 
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Old 06-06-2012, 07:45 AM   #7
mattd2
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Sep 2009
Papamoa, New Zealand
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mloster View Post
Just as you can malt quinoa, millet, etc., couldn't you malt brown rice and use it as a grain in your beer? You could roast the malt to different lovibond to achieve specific flavors as is done with barley. I may have to give it a try.
By that do you mean the brown rice you can buy in 2# bags at the supermarket? or does it have to be unprocessed? Interesting!

 
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Old 06-06-2012, 12:11 PM   #8
igliashon
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Feb 2012
Oakland, CA
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http://www.instructables.com/id/HOWT...ed-brown-rice/

 
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Old 06-06-2012, 04:33 PM   #9
mloster
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Jul 2011
Santa Barbara, CA
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If I can find the paper again, I'll post it here. It tested different germinating times and temperatures in brown rice, just the medium hulled kind you'd buy at the store. By soaking it at 30C for 4 days, the highest levels of alpha and beta enzymes were achieved. In soaking longer, alpha increased but beta decreased. Therefor 4 days was the optimum. Extending this into real life application. I'd take my BIAB bag, fill it with x lbs of brown rice, fill a bucket with warm water, and let it sit. I'd change the water/ rinse the rice every 12 hours or so. I'd continue this until 4 days had passed. (Note: brown rice can sprout under water) From there, the rice would be sprouted but not malted. I'd then go through the normal procedure of kilning and roasting to various levels. Then I'd probably brew with a single infusion mash, maybe adding some amylase and mashing for several hours or overnight.

 
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Old 06-06-2012, 05:21 PM   #10
igliashon
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Feb 2012
Oakland, CA
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Worth noting about rice: its gelatinization temperature varies with variety, but is usually between 60 and 70C (140 to 156F). Japonica varieties tend to have lower GTs. Compelling!

 
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