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Old 06-05-2012, 05:34 AM   #1
Spring_Chicken
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Nov 2010
Snohomish, WA
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Ok, just got done wiring up my control panel and I have a few questions.

1. If I use my Fluke multimeter on the AC setting can I hold onto one probe, or put it on a copper pipe, while to other is on my kettle to make sure it won't fry me?

2. Do both hot lines really go to the burner? It doesn't make sense to me because AC IS like a current, and this is more like DC where it would just travel to it.

Thanks for your help.
- Paul



 
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Old 06-05-2012, 12:53 PM   #2
stlbeer
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You have a ground running to your kettle, right?

The element will be grounded via the threads to the kettle. The path of least resistance will be to ground, not you.


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Old 06-05-2012, 01:04 PM   #3
Spring_Chicken
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Yes. I have a ground. However, I don't trust electricity. It's invisible and therefore both magical and deadly.

 
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Old 06-05-2012, 01:19 PM   #4
kgalle
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Apologies for the hijack, but I have one of these for a system in progress. Is there any need for additional grounding?

 
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Old 06-05-2012, 06:52 PM   #5
audger
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., Connecticut
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any kettle that has an electric element in it should have a sturdy path to ground.

to answer the orig. questions...
1- yes, you can measure any voltage between the kettle and a ground source. it should be zero or nearly zero (a few mV can be normal. if its more than 1 volt i would start being concerned).
2- yes, both hots go to the heating element for 240v systems. 240v is the combination of two incoming 120v lines (essentially one is +120v and -120v). the voltage potential between +120 and -120 is a total of 240 volts. so if you measure the voltage between ground and either of the "hot" legs, it will measure 120v. if you measure the voltage between the two "hot" legs, it will total 240v.

 
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Old 06-05-2012, 07:34 PM   #6
Spring_Chicken
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Thanks!



 
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