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Old 11-29-2012, 01:53 AM   #21
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I'm not sure the things of need for my panel besides what I've listed above. I'm assuming an SSR for the PID, a heat sink. Would I need an additional SSR for the PWM as well? Guess I have a lot more research to do.


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Old 11-29-2012, 02:53 AM   #22
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Ssr controls one leg of 220v AC. Most designs use a contactor, power relay, or 30 amp switch to disable both phases when the element is off. Contactor or relay coil can also be tied to an e-stop. Check out some of the schematics posted on the forum.


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Old 11-29-2012, 03:10 PM   #23
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Yes, I would recommend getting your design figured out once you know what sort of process you want to use. Once the design is known you'll know what parts you need. Once you know what parts you need you'll know what sized enclosure you need.

Otherwise you're working backwards. Sort of like asking how big of a toolbox you need to carry all your tools when you don't know what tools you need yet.

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Old 11-30-2012, 03:07 AM   #24
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Kal. Rather than use a 4 prong outlet/plug for a panel, could you just hardware the cable from you main breaker to the control panel?
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Old 11-30-2012, 04:23 AM   #25
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You can hardwire a power cord to the control panel, but hardwiring anything to your breaker panel is a massive can of worms:

If/when you hardwire to your breaker panel everything hardwired in (ie: the whole control panel) now becomes part of the electrical structure of the house and to be correct has to be done 100% to code. If you reno your house the electrical inspector doesn't care what type of stereo or lamps you plug into your outlets. But if you hardware anything in, then the items have to be part of the inspection. In the case of the control panel they would want specific certifications to make sure it passes. That costs many thousands of dollars.

IMHO the fact that you're asking if it's ok means you really should not be doing it.

Just my 2 cents.

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Old 11-30-2012, 04:26 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kal
You can hardwire a power cord to the control panel, but hardwiring anything to your breaker panel is a massive can of worms:

If/when you hardwire to your breaker panel everything hardwired in (ie: the whole control panel) now becomes part of the electrical structure of the house and to be correct has to be done 100% to code.

IMHO the fact that you're asking if it's ok means you really should not be doing it.

Kal
I'm not going to be doing it. One of my close friends is an experience electrician. He's the one who'll be doing it. I'd planned on doing everything to code.
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Old 11-30-2012, 04:30 AM   #27
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I don't think you understand the point I was trying to make. Every device you hardwire into your house electrical grid must meet all sorts of specific certifications that you likely won't meet regardless of who does the wiring unless you're very careful with the choice of parts you use.

I highly suggest you don't do this. You're trying to save about $50 in plugs by directly hardwiring to the electrical panel and causing all sorts of complexities with inspectors/permits? (Since you say you want to do it all by the book). I don't understand the logic in that.

At the end of the day the choice is yours of course.

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Old 11-30-2012, 04:42 AM   #28
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No I'm not doing it to save the cost of the outlet. I just though it would be a cleaner looking setup if I could hardware the control panel and have it built into the wall, rather than bolting it to the wall.
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Old 11-30-2012, 01:18 PM   #29
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Hardwiring correctly and to code would require the thing you build to most likely to be CSA/UL certified and approved and/or all the parts inside would have to be CSA/UL certified/approved.

The reason you can't just wire anything into your electrical grid is the same reason you're not allowed to "make" your own light switches or electrical sockets or similar.

If you ever have any issues or problems and (heaven forbid) the house burns down due to a failed part or faulty wiring and you did not have sign-off by inspectors and permitting agents, your insurance company is not going to pay you.

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Old 11-30-2012, 01:36 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kal
Hardwiring correctly and to code would require the thing you build to most likely to be CSA/UL certified and approved and/or all the parts inside would have to be CSA/UL certified/approved.

The reason you can't just wire anything into your electrical grid is the same reason you're not allowed to "make" your own light switches or electrical sockets or similar.

If you ever have any issues or problems and (heaven forbid) the house burns down due to a failed part or faulty wiring and you did not have sign-off by inspectors and permitting agents, your insurance company is not going to pay you.

Kal
Ok thanks. Sounds like a whole lot of extra work. Thanks for all the help really appreciate it!


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