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Old 05-13-2012, 09:44 PM   #1
MuchoDestructo
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May 2012
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I came upon 1/2 # of galena pellet hops, 14%aa, looking for suggestions that aren't an IPA. Prefer to brew all grain but not allergic to extract. I've never used these hops before, what should I be looking for?

 
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Old 05-13-2012, 10:13 PM   #2
Quaker
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I've used them twice; both times in an equal parts blend with Citra and Cascade. One batch was a simple APA and the other an amber. There was nothing distinctive in the aroma or flavor of the finished beers that I could have tagged as Galena. So I can at least tell you mine didn't clash with citrusy hops.

I'd recommend making a small (like a 6 pack's volume fermented in a gallon jug) extract batch of a pale ale using only Galena throughout, taste it, then decide what to do with the rest.
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Old 05-13-2012, 10:27 PM   #3
jmprdood
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They are pretty neutral, like it says below - balanced.

http://usahops.org/userfiles/file/HG...ch%202011).pdf


GALENA
Galena is a high alpha variety that was developed in the
Idaho state breeding program in 1978. It has balanced bittering
properties combined with an agreeable aroma profile.
Galena’s storage stability is excellent. It has often used in
both English and American-style Ales.
Yield (kilos per hectare) 1,904 - 2,352
Yield (lbs per acre) 1,700 - 2,100
Alpha Acids 11.5 - 13.5%
Beta Acids 7.2 - 8.7%
Cohumulone (% of alpha acids) 36 - 40%
Total Oils (Mls. per 100 grams dried hops) 0.9 - 1.3
Myrcene (as % of total oils) 55 - 60%
Caryophyllene (as % of total oils) 4.5 - 5.5%
Humulene (as % of total oils) 10 - 13%
Farnesene (as % of total oils) < 1.0%
Storage (% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage at 20° C) 79%
Possible Substitutions Nugget, CTZ
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Old 05-13-2012, 10:44 PM   #4
ArcaneXor
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It's a fairly harsh bittering hop (high beta acids, low cohumalone), similar to Nugget, CTZ or Chinook when used at the 60' mark.

 
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Old 05-13-2012, 10:48 PM   #5
Yooper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcaneXor View Post
It's a fairly harsh bittering hop (high beta acids, low cohumalone), similar to Nugget, CTZ or Chinook when used at the 60' mark.
That's been my experience, too. It's not as harsh as some, and there doesn't seem to be much flavor impact, but it can be a bit harsh when compared to a variety like, say, magnum. It's best described as "sharp", I think. It's not bad, but it's definitely a sharp bitterness. It's actually a high cohumulone hop variety- that's why it's harsh.

In small amounts, like you'd use for most beers, I think it'd be fine for many styles for bittering . Since it's so high in AAUs you don't need much!
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Old 05-13-2012, 11:03 PM   #6
jmprdood
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Yooper is correct, a little goes a long way.
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Old 05-14-2012, 12:04 AM   #7
MuchoDestructo
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Thanks everyone, appreciate the knowledge. Looking forward to playing around with these hops.

 
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Old 05-14-2012, 01:41 AM   #8
harrymanback92
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I use these at the 5 minute mark in my bitters. For me, it's awesome. The taste is very earthy and I pair it with northern brewer and kent goldings. It's definetly similar to chinhook, with a little less of what I would describe as the pungent skunkyness you get with chinhook. My two cents.


My bitters are definetly an American style bitter.
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Old 05-14-2012, 03:16 AM   #9
jonmohno
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Its described as a clean bittering hop,as suggested i would not over use it.I think its fairly versitile though.I think it has a smoothness to it as well as clean. I didnt think it was or had citrus as described more of mild herbal sorta earthy but clean/smooth hop.Like a strong but quiet hop.I think its very similar to nugget though as well.
I was visiting a brewery in Galena IL,and was talking to the brewmaster while doing a flight sampler i was impressed by most of them- he then stated (after i asked)they use galena hops in most?/ all their beers exclusivly.They even grow some locally.Think he noted using Cali2 yeast i was inspired to use these also in my brews and have turned out great.

 
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