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Old 05-11-2012, 01:27 AM   #1
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Default old chest freezer need advice

I recently received this large chest freezer that I'm planning on using for a fermentation chamber but it's got some rust mold/mildew issues. What steps should I take to get this up to ferm chamber standards?

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Old 05-11-2012, 01:35 AM   #2
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Old 05-11-2012, 02:43 AM   #3
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One more think is a rust killer. Naval Jelly works. It is what I used on mine. Scrub everything. Rescrub with bleach. Rinse with plain water and let dry. Use rust killer/naval jelly as instructions say. Then use the appliance paint. You will need at least 2 cans and 3 coats. Don't forget to sand the rust spots and any loose paint. I used black since that was the original outside color. I wish I had used a bright color inside so I can see any problems if they come back. Don't forget some damp rid or some kind of moisture control.
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Old 05-11-2012, 06:21 AM   #4
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So sand the rust then apply the rust killer and paint? Do I need to prime first or just do several coats of the appliance paint?
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Old 05-11-2012, 07:54 AM   #5
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On the can of appliance paint I bought it says specifically not to prime.
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Old 05-11-2012, 09:58 AM   #6
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I had a lesser problem than yours, but I used Borax.
It is a powder that comes in a box. In the grocery laundry section they sell it. It is one of those really useful, muti-use things.

1 cup powder with about a gallon of water, makes a good cleaning liquid.
Scrub with it using a brush and really put your elbow into it.
Then let it air dry, the material is a mold inhibitor, so once evaporation occurs any remaining Borax will inhibit future growth.
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Old 05-11-2012, 12:11 PM   #7
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Tilex worked great on the mildew I had in my freezer when I got it. It's made for cleaning the mildew from grout in the shower, but it worked like a charm. Easy to use and not crazy toxic. Just spray it on and wipe it off. If the mildew's really bad you can scrub with a non-abrasive scrubber.
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Old 05-11-2012, 04:44 PM   #8
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I think I'm headed to Home Depot during my lunch break to pick up some supplies! My e-bay temp controller came in the mail too so I need to go get a project box and an extension cord.
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Old 05-11-2012, 05:16 PM   #9
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I highly recommend removing the inside plastic from the lid, removing the insulation, cleaning the inside metal of the lid, putting some fresh insulation in there with a plastic vapor barrier and then replacing the inside plastic. Most likely there's going to be a lot of nasty moldy gunk on the inside of that lid.
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Old 05-11-2012, 06:28 PM   #10
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I would clean it, and kill any mildew with bleach, spraybomb it w/ inexpensive paint and be happy...not worth putting too much time, money, or energy into an old freezer...might last 20 days, or 20 years???


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