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Old 05-10-2012, 02:32 PM   #1
Eltenchiz
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Default First time saison

Hi all,
This is the first time I have made a Saison and just wanted to see if you all think this recipe looks good. Please tell me if you think I should change anything before going to the brew shop tomorrow. Thanks
3lbs Belgian pale malt
3lbs English pale malt
3lbs Belgian pilsin malt
.5lbs Munich(light) malt
.5lbs wheat malt
.5lbs caramunich
1lbs candi sugar
1oz goldings(kent) 5.9% AA 60min
.5oz pacific jade 12.9% AA 60min (this is a New Zealand hop used in IPA's mostly, but I have a half oz left over from my last brew so I figured I would try it on this)
1oz goldings (kent) 5.9% AA 5min

I used 2oz of goldings because my brew shop only sells hops in 2oz bags and I am a cheap ass and don't want to spend extra.


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Old 05-10-2012, 02:46 PM   #2
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Oh and white labs 565


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Old 05-10-2012, 02:53 PM   #3
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I'm no expert but it seems like both your gravities and IBU's will be a bit on the high end for the style. Pacific jade is an interesting choice, did you consider splitting that 1/2 oz. up between the beginning and end of the boil too? Just a thought. Good luck!
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Old 05-10-2012, 03:02 PM   #4
mewithstewpid
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i have a couple of suggestions:

1) simplicity. saisons were originally brewed with few ingredients. I recommend just using the belgian pilsner malt and the wheat malt, ditch the munich s and others. keep the belgian candi sugar, that will dry it out, typical of the style

2) add the .5oz pac jade at the end with the EKG at 5min for aroma. that will give it some nice peppery notes.
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Old 05-10-2012, 03:06 PM   #5
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Agreed. Keep it simple. Drop the pale malts and stick with the Pilsner malt. Add the wheat, and I'd actually keep the Munich as is.
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Old 05-10-2012, 03:14 PM   #6
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Ok, so simplicity is the key. I'll go all 9lbs pilsin, 1ibs wheat and 1ibs candi. I was thinking about the PAC jade at 5 in the beginning but I was afraid it might mask some of the yeast flavors. I'll do it tho.
Homebrewhaha, the gravity is high for a traditional style but american saisons usually get up there. At least from what I have been reading.
Would a half pound of Carapils be good or does a saison not need that
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Old 05-10-2012, 03:37 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eltenchiz View Post
Homebrewhaha, the gravity is high for a traditional style but american saisons usually get up there. At least from what I have been reading.
Good point.
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Old 05-10-2012, 04:01 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eltenchiz View Post
Ok, so simplicity is the key. I'll go all 9lbs pilsin, 1ibs wheat and 1ibs candi. I was thinking about the PAC jade at 5 in the beginning but I was afraid it might mask some of the yeast flavors. I'll do it tho.
Homebrewhaha, the gravity is high for a traditional style but american saisons usually get up there. At least from what I have been reading.
Would a half pound of Carapils be good or does a saison not need that
With just Belgian Pils, pound of wheat and sugar, you will be close to Saison Dupont style and really don't need the Cara Pils.
If you ferment warm, the yeast notes will definitely shine through. Good luck!
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Old 05-11-2012, 01:29 PM   #9
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I messed up...I went to the brew shop yesterday and got to talking to the guy there and ended up marking the wrong grain on the sheet. So now the bulk of my grain is Belgian pale malt. Idiot..
Now that my malts have changed I was wondering what I should do about the mash. Before with the pilsin malts I was going to do like 60min at 140F and raise it up to 155F for another 10min. Now I am using pale instead of pilsin should I just do a 155F 60min mash? Thanks again everyone
2lbs wheat
1lbs Munich (light)
8lbs Belgian pale
.5lbs carapils (I decided to just get it anyway)
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Old 05-11-2012, 02:01 PM   #10
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You'll be fine. Pils is more traditional and preferred by most but you can make a saison with just about anything.
For my saisons lately I've been mashing around 147-148 for 40 min then raising to 156 for 30 min. Results have been really good. I've also done a quick protein rest on the high side on several (no solid conclusions yet on whether it helped anything or not but doesn't seem to have hurt).
One other thing: with that yeast you're going to want to ferment ridiculously hot. Dupont ferments around 90F (I know it sounds crazy but that yeast can handle it). If you want a trouble-free fermentation I'd pitch around 85 and let it ride up to around 90. If you ferment on the cool side or even if you start cool and ramp-up as some do, you may be in for a very long ferm.


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