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Old 06-27-2007, 04:20 AM   #1
syankey
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Okay, I'm now on my 8th batch of extract with seeping grains. I want to work out my consistency and get my procedures down before I make the jump to all grain (hopefully this fall/winter). I've been very satisfiyed with every batch I've made so far. My absolute favorite was an Old Speckled Hen clone. I'm really into Irish and English Ales at the moment and I really like the smooth creamy taste of the original OSH. My clone was pretty good but lacked a bit of body the original has. I'm guessing I could experiment around with different seeping grains (types and quantity) and was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on how to add a bit of smooth creamy body to my ales?

Checked Wiki...would anyone recommend adding a seeping grain with some good mouthfeel properties?

Thanks again....Scott



 
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Old 06-27-2007, 05:25 AM   #2
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CaraPils for a steeping grain or add Lactose. Both are unfermentable and will give it a more creamy mouthfeel.


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Old 06-27-2007, 05:40 AM   #3
Muss
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I too am on a quest for nice creamy beers.

The bottom line is you need to keg with beer gas (Nitrogen + Carbondioxide), which is how Guinness and Kilkenny are made creamy and I think OSH might be too.

I've just made Cheesefoods caramel cream ale recipe which included lactose and it is rather thick and creamy, but in a different way to the British ales listed above. Lactose is unfermentable milk sugar so it will also make the beer rather sweet.

I'd love to know what happens if you drop a tiny bit of liquid nitrogen in the bottle before capping in an attempt to create beer gas in bottles. I suspect they would end up mode deadly than hand grenades though.

 
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Old 06-27-2007, 05:40 AM   #4
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Maltodextrin can also help. It's easy to use.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=30394

http://www.beer-wine.com/product_inf...96&sectionID=1

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dextrin
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Old 06-27-2007, 03:23 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syankey

Checked Wiki...would anyone recommend adding a seeping grain with some good mouthfeel properties?
How about oatmeal? Allow me to quote from the scriptures. (Book of Palmer!)

12.2 Other Grains and Adjuncts

Oatmeal 1 L Oats are wonderful in a porter or stout. Oatmeal lends a smooth, silky mouthfeel and a creaminess to a stout that must be tasted to be understood. Oats are available whole, steel-cut (i.e. grits), rolled, and flaked. Rolled and flaked oats have had their starches gelatinized (made soluble) by heat and pressure, and are most readily available as "Instant Oatmeal" in the grocery store. Whole oats and "Old Fashioned Rolled Oats" have not had the degree of gelatinization that Instant have had and must be cooked before adding to the mash. "Quick" oatmeal has had a degree of gelatinization but does benefit from being cooked before adding to the mash. Cook according to the directions on the box (but add more water) to ensure that the starches will be fully utilized. Use 0.5-1.5 lb. per 5 gal batch. Oats need to be mashed with barley malt (and its enzymes) for conversion.

 
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Old 06-27-2007, 04:46 PM   #6
syankey
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Maltodextrin sounds like a worthy experiment. Sounds like I could boil and ferment in primary as usual then rack into 2 3 gallon secondarys, use one as the control and the other a Matlodextrin experiement for a side by side comparison. I'm thinking I want to stay away from Lactose...I don't want my OSH clone to be too sweet.

The other questions that popped into my mind was the signature way a Guiness or a OSH (at least from a can) settles out. I'd like to be able to get that beautiful cascade of carbonation making its way to a nice creamy head.

I'm assuming this is a property of a grain. Would steeping CaraPils possible add this property as well as some additional mouthfeel?


 
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Old 06-27-2007, 04:57 PM   #7
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flaked oats were the first thing that sprang to my mind but you'll need to partial mash
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Old 06-27-2007, 11:32 PM   #8
Muss
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syankey
The other questions that popped into my mind was the signature way a Guiness or a OSH (at least from a can) settles out. I'd like to be able to get that beautiful cascade of carbonation making its way to a nice creamy head.
I don't know for sure but I think that's the nitrogen doing that

 
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Old 06-28-2007, 12:23 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muss
I don't know for sure but I think that's the nitrogen doing that
This is correct. A nitrogen atom is much, much smaller than a CO2 molecule, which is why the beer appears to "cascade" inside the glass, as opposed to the all-too-simple CO2 bubble rising. To achieve this property in your beer, you would have to keg with nitrogen, which requires different fittings/guages than CO2 does. Eventually I am going to make the leap to nitrogen kegging, but not any time soon! I just can't get enough of that cascade effect, but since I'm fairly new to brewing, I can't justify the expense!

So, here's a list of beers I recall that cascade:
  • Guinness
  • Boddingtons
  • Belhaven Scotish Ale
  • Wexford Irish Cream [might be wrong about this one, it's been too long]
  • Old Speckeled Hen
  • Youngs Double Chocolate Stout & Outmeal Stout

I'm sure there is more, but that's all I can seem to remember at the moment. If anyone would care to add to the list, I'm always open to a new cascading beer!

 
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Old 06-28-2007, 01:11 AM   #10
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only thing i can add is that i believe it is a co2/nitrogen mix...60/40 or 40/60 or something...

i want to do this for my friend's coffee porter, probably before next years desert trip


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