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Old 05-03-2012, 02:23 AM   #1
scottyg354
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May 2011
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Hi Guys,

I have been extract brewing for about a year now. I wouldn't call my self a pro but I think I almost past the novice stage in this area. I am getting ready to begin all grain brewing. I am running into one issue though and I am curious if it will resolve when I switch to all grain and if it is common with extract brewing. I cannot seem to get a good aroma when brewing with extracts. My beers always have a yeasty smell to them. I don't get the nice hop aromas or malt aromas you get from store bought craft beers. Is this due to my extract brewing? Will the aroma come when I switch to all grain?

Please note my beers all taste perfectly fine.


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Secondary: Saison Brett

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Old 05-03-2012, 02:50 AM   #2
SoupNazi
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Feb 2012
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Perhaps a water composition issue. Are you using tap or distilled?


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Old 05-03-2012, 03:31 AM   #3
Runyanka
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So you dry hop or add late additions in the boil? This is where aroma comes from.
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Old 05-03-2012, 05:45 AM   #4
helibrewer
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What types of yeast are you using and are your fermentation temps controlled?
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Old 05-03-2012, 12:24 PM   #5
scottyg354
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May 2011
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I don't dry hop. The latest I usually put hops in is 15 minutes. Too early for aroma?

Temp varies maybe +/-5 degrees from 68 degrees.
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brewSTEIN Beer Co.

Milk is for babies. When you grow up you have to drink beer.

-Arnold Schwarzenegger

On Deck: Helles, Oktoberfest, Saison, Apple Graff

Primary: IPA, Scottish Export

Secondary: Saison Brett

Bottled/Kegged/Gone:
Cream Ale, Peanut Butter Brown, Belgian Golden Strong, Brown Sugar Cider, Cream Ale, Double IPA, Saison, Summer Ale, Honey IPA, Maple Apple Graff, Holiday Stout, Hard Cider, English Brown, Scottish Heavy

 
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Old 05-03-2012, 12:54 PM   #6
AmandaK
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Feb 2010
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I doubt this is an "all grain vs extract" issue. Most issues (unless your beer tastes like old extract tin cans) are not solved when you switch to all grain. I would not recommend switching to the more confusing world of all grain until you are making awesome extracts.

I believe this is a fermentation issue. +/- 5 degrees is A LOT in the yeast world. You're saying you basically ferment between 62* and 72*. All that flux will cause the yeast to get upset and not produce the flavors and aromas you want. (You note an yeasty aroma...) Control your fermentation temperatures better, and ferment it out completely (e.g. don't rack to a secondary after 10 days), pitch a proper amount and type of yeast and then see what happens.

Hope that helps.
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Old 05-03-2012, 12:57 PM   #7
scottyg354
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Any suggestions for temp control?
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Milk is for babies. When you grow up you have to drink beer.

-Arnold Schwarzenegger

On Deck: Helles, Oktoberfest, Saison, Apple Graff

Primary: IPA, Scottish Export

Secondary: Saison Brett

Bottled/Kegged/Gone:
Cream Ale, Peanut Butter Brown, Belgian Golden Strong, Brown Sugar Cider, Cream Ale, Double IPA, Saison, Summer Ale, Honey IPA, Maple Apple Graff, Holiday Stout, Hard Cider, English Brown, Scottish Heavy

 
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Old 05-03-2012, 01:08 PM   #8
Whippy
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I would like to ask how long you are letting your beers condition. Sometimes your beer's true character does not really shine through until a few weeks in primary and a few weeks after bottling. I was often plauged by yeasty aromas until I started letting my beers sit and condition longer. Some styles will need less time.

Are you looking for hop aroma or malt aroma? If you are looking for more malt aroma, I would say that there ARE ways to improve this when all-grain brewing. If you are looking for hop aroma, late hop additions in the boil is helpful and dry hopping is great
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Old 05-03-2012, 01:32 PM   #9
duboman
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+1 to al of the above suggestions and questions to consider.

If you are looking for stronger hop aroma consider doing more 5 minute and flameout additions, or dry hop

If you are looking for more malt then take a closer look at fermentation temps and conditioning time.

I have noted that with extract brewing issues when similarity of beers becomes an issue, a simple change of water is a good place to start. Try brewing the next batch of a beer you have already done with bottled or R/O water and compare to the previous. You might be pleasantly surprised.........

It is important to not change too many elements at the same time, just do one at a time.

Cheers!

 
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Old 05-03-2012, 03:39 PM   #10
scottyg354
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May 2011
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Ok guys I'll work with those tips. Any other suggestions for maintaining temperature? I don't have a fridge available currently although I am planning to do a ferm. chamber setup sometime this fall or winter.

I live in PA which has all four season. I tend to brew during all four. Spring and fall usually average temps around 40-60, Summer usually 70-90 and Winter 20-40. So I'm dealing with some variance here. My basement has the most stable temp (dark and cool). Temp down there varies from a low 60 in the winter to a high of 73 in the summer (if memory serves me right).


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brewSTEIN Beer Co.

Milk is for babies. When you grow up you have to drink beer.

-Arnold Schwarzenegger

On Deck: Helles, Oktoberfest, Saison, Apple Graff

Primary: IPA, Scottish Export

Secondary: Saison Brett

Bottled/Kegged/Gone:
Cream Ale, Peanut Butter Brown, Belgian Golden Strong, Brown Sugar Cider, Cream Ale, Double IPA, Saison, Summer Ale, Honey IPA, Maple Apple Graff, Holiday Stout, Hard Cider, English Brown, Scottish Heavy

 
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