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Old 04-28-2012, 05:03 PM   #1
jknapp12105
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Default Apricot Ale

So I bought a Light Beer mix and I am going to add Apricots to the mix. I am going to make 5 gal. Should I use dried Apricots or Fresh Apricots? Should I boil them before adding them to the secondary? What should I worry about when they are fermenting? Is the fermentation process the same? (I.e. one week primary, one week secondary, 2 week bottling) or is it different?

Thanks


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Old 04-28-2012, 05:27 PM   #2
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I am also looking at an apricot beer. I read somewhere someone used 1 lb of fresh apricots and pured them then cooked them down at 180 degrees for 20 minutes thn added them to his secondary. Which lead me to wonder. If you buy an apricot jelly or spread is that already "strile" from pasturization and can you just use that?


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Old 04-29-2012, 12:48 AM   #3
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Last week I used some dry apricots. Need to ensure they don't have any sulphur on them as it can stall the yeast. I got mine from Whole Food Market

I used 3 ozs per gallon, which is the equivalent of about 1 lb of fresh apricots per gallon.

Many people say you can just add fruit to secondary, but I get concerned about wild yeast, so I pasteurize it by heating it in some water to 150 F and letting it sit for 10 minutes or more. I chopped the apricots up. To pasteurize you need to be at 140 F for 20 minutes, or 160 F for 5 seconds. Heating too high will set the pectins in the fruit and give you a hazy beer that you will never be able to clear.
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Old 04-29-2012, 02:15 AM   #4
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I've got 5 bottles in my fridge you can have.
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Old 04-29-2012, 03:06 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder
Last week I used some dry apricots. Need to ensure they don't have any sulphur on them as it can stall the yeast. I got mine from Whole Food Market

I used 3 ozs per gallon, which is the equivalent of about 1 lb of fresh apricots per gallon.

Many people say you can just add fruit to secondary, but I get concerned about wild yeast, so I pasteurize it by heating it in some water to 150 F and letting it sit for 10 minutes or more. I chopped the apricots up. To pasteurize you need to be at 140 F for 20 minutes, or 160 F for 5 seconds. Heating too high will set the pectins in the fruit and give you a hazy beer that you will never be able to clear.
Thanks for the info! We will see if it works!
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Old 04-29-2012, 11:29 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder
Last week I used some dry apricots. Need to ensure they don't have any sulphur on them as it can stall the yeast. I got mine from Whole Food Market

I used 3 ozs per gallon, which is the equivalent of about 1 lb of fresh apricots per gallon.

Many people say you can just add fruit to secondary, but I get concerned about wild yeast, so I pasteurize it by heating it in some water to 150 F and letting it sit for 10 minutes or more. I chopped the apricots up. To pasteurize you need to be at 140 F for 20 minutes, or 160 F for 5 seconds. Heating too high will set the pectins in the fruit and give you a hazy beer that you will never be able to clear.
Why are you worried about wild yeast in a secondary? I used pasteurized canned apricots and rack beer on top of it. Less stress more mess (in the bucket) and let it sit 3 weeks before bottling/ legging and another 10 days (do it on a Wednesday ) before tasting
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:14 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post
Last week I used some dry apricots. Need to ensure they don't have any sulphur on them as it can stall the yeast. I got mine from Whole Food Market

I used 3 ozs per gallon, which is the equivalent of about 1 lb of fresh apricots per gallon.
clear.
how well did the flavor of apricots come out? local brewery great south bay has a blonde ambition ale which is fermented with apricots and have a very distinct flavor that i have on my to do list.
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:23 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DurtyChemist View Post
Why are you worried about wild yeast in a secondary? I used pasteurized canned apricots and rack beer on top of it. Less stress more mess (in the bucket) and let it sit 3 weeks before bottling/ legging and another 10 days (do it on a Wednesday ) before tasting
What's your point? You added pasteurized apricots straight from the can. All I did was pasteurize mine, since they were not from a sanitized can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnyhitch1 View Post
how well did the flavor of apricots come out? local brewery great south bay has a blonde ambition ale which is fermented with apricots and have a very distinct flavor that i have on my to do list.
It is going to be a while until I will be able to tell. I only added them last week. It's a fruit Lambic, I plan to have the beer on the fruit for at least 6 months.
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Old 04-30-2012, 03:49 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Calder View Post
What's your point? You added pasteurized apricots straight from the can. All I did was pasteurize mine, since they were not from a sanitized can.



It is going to be a while until I will be able to tell. I only added them last week. It's a fruit Lambic, I plan to have the beer on the fruit for at least 6 months.
my mistake i thought it was for an ale.
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Old 05-01-2012, 11:30 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DurtyChemist

Why are you worried about wild yeast in a secondary? I used pasteurized canned apricots and rack beer on top of it. Less stress more mess (in the bucket) and let it sit 3 weeks before bottling/ legging and another 10 days (do it on a Wednesday ) before tasting
Can you give me the procedures you followed when using the apricot purée? Including the time period for primary, secondary, and bottling.

Thanks


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